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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Some Nice Surprises

Because of spider mites who love dry heat, this has not been the best summer for my brugmansias. This one was the hardest hit but the bugs seem to be gone now thanks to regular spraying with neem oil.  Though it has few leaves, the poor thing is finally blooming.


It's a little Dr. Seussian looking with mostly bare branches with blooms at the ends but they're still pretty.

Not to mention the wonderful fragrance!

The other day, I stopped by Windmill Nursery because I was in the area and was delighted to find that all plants are on sale for 40% off.  Later in the year the discounts go even lower but I couldn't resist this trio of Agave paryii var. truncata. Here they are potted up and ready to go out on the front steps once the scaffolding comes down.  (The garden assistant is painting the house - more on that in another post.)  They're hardy to zone 7 and I added a lot of perlite to the soil and they're in terra cotta pots so I'm thinking of leaving them outside this winter.  Do you think they'll make it in the rain or should I bring them back up to the covered porch for the winter?

21 comments:

  1. Gorgeous blooms!
    As for these beautiful agaves... I'd bring them to the covered porch. Or, leave one (only one!) outside and see what happens... Good luck!

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    1. If it gets really wet, I'll bring them up to the covered porch. I like your idea of experimenting with one to see what happens.

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  2. There's a pest for all types of weather, isn't there? I'd probably leave one Agave out and bring two under cover this year and see how things go.

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    1. Yes! Lots fewer slugs in my garden this summer!

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  3. In the best of worlds, Brugs would have no pests. There would be ample rainfall, the weather would be perfect. In spite of every adversity, they manage to drop leaves and bloom on. Mine were badly neglected when I couldn't help myself much less drag hoses. They're about to enter another cycle of glorious bloom with no help.

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    1. Brugs seem determined to live no matter what happens!

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  4. Oh Yes! I bought a bunch of plants at Windmill's sale recently too, as well as some nice pots (they were buy one get one free). Since you have 3 of those Agaves, you could always keep two on the porch and see how the third does out in the rain. They look lovely in their matching pots.

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    1. Ooh, I didn't notice the pot sale. Maybe a return visit is in order!

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  5. Unless you buy them tiny fins and teach them to swim, I'd secure the little Agave on the porch.

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    1. Agave swimming lessons...I'll look in the phone book and see if anyone offers classes.

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  6. All plants 40% off!!!??? That's crazy talk! I would leave the Agaves out. In terracotta and with well draining soil they should be fine. If we get some freaky cold ice storm you can always move them spur of the moment.

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    1. Okay, Agave queen, I'll give it a go. There were several pups in the pots so I'll have backups in the greenhouse.

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  7. 40% off sounds good! They're one of the hardier ones so more likely they'll be ok, although if it gets really cold in pots you always have the option to shift them later.

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    1. True. They'll be in a fairly warm spot but shifting is always an option.

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  8. The bugs fled as soon as I took my Brugs outside, but they have no scent that I can detect. Funny...the one I got at Means for $1.99 is blooming like mad, while the one from Hortlandia has yet to produce a bud.

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    1. Strange creatures they are. Only fragrant at night though.

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  9. The idea of Agave drowning in the rain is an entirely foreign concept to me...

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    1. When you move up, you'll become familiar with the concept!

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  10. The brugmansia blooms are gorgeous, but I'm so jealous of your purchases! I can't be much help with the rain question as I'm not sure how much you normally get, but at least they're small enough to move if you get a large block of consecutive rainy days.

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    1. We get quite a bit of rain in the winter - some big storms that dump a lot but mostly it's just light rain that keeps the soil wet for months.

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  11. The brugs look great. I'm surprised they're not sulking after all the leaf loss.
    I gave all of mine away when the kids came along, fearing for the poisons but then realized a little too late that my kids don't just go around eating things. Of course by then my friend had killed them all!
    I do clip the tips of my agaves. The kids inherited my clumsiness.
    They overwinter anywhere (the agaves) as long as they don't get any water, but in my zone it has to be inside.
    Frank

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.