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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Friday, March 29, 2019

Random Spring Stuff from My Garden

Snowdrops and crocus are finished, hellebores continue and, with the advent of warmer weather, new leaves are popping up everywhere.  Now, if I could only remember where I planted those tulips last fall.  Oh well, if they lived, they'll bloom one of these days. Let's take an after-work stroll around to see what's new.

Impatiens omeiana 'Silver Pink'


Podophyllum 'Red Panda'


Magnolia time!


Begonia pedatifida


Acer palmatum


Yellow violets

Peony 'Coral Charm'
 In the greenhouse, clivias are putting on  a nice show. 


I have several rhipsalis that are all different but were all sold with a label reading simply Rhipsalis.  It's a step above "assorted succulents."  Anyway, this one, which I think is rhipsalis salicornioides, has yellow blooms  that perfume the entire greenhouse for a couple of weeks. 


There are various echeverias and aloes blooming in the greenhouse as well but some of the flowers are hiding behind other plants at the moment.


Tillandsias did well this winter. 

Back outside - Tree peony. 

Some rhododendron purchased years ago at Heronswood for it's interesting foliage.  It's finally decided to bloom.  Since it's grown too large for the space, seeing this will make it easier to cut back nearly to the ground.


The vibrant pink color of these Acer palmatum leaves lingers until mid summer.

The main trunk broke under the snow load and I just noticed it.  Hope it'll survive.

Sinopanax formosanus  looking unfazed by the strange winter weather. 

 Agave 'Mr. Ripple'  looking a bit battered but the center is still firm so hopefully it'll be okay.


Daphne odora makes everything better, right? 
I hope spring is bringing you lots of happy surprises!
Happy weekend all!

19 comments:

  1. Aww, I'm so sorry about your poor Maple... I do hope it manages to go on. My Agave looks a bit mushy too, which surprised me, as the little snow we had was comparatively brief, and the rest of our winter rather warm and dry. I should probably move it to a better spot... I'm thrilled with all the leaves popping all over the place. Every day there is a new surprise - hooray for spring!

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    1. Sorry about your agave. So happy that spring is finally here.

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  2. I admit to not being really good with plants names, but "assorted succulents" gets me every time, especially in nurseries, where I my expectations are higher then big box stores.
    That aside, your Rhipsalis looks dashing, and is fragrant to boot.

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    1. Someone posted a picture of a printed plant label that read "Succulent Ass." and now I chuckle every time I see an Assorted Succulent label

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    1. I brought in several pups in case he decides to give up the ghost.

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  4. Love the flowering Rhipsalis! I have one that must flower without me noticing, because occasionally it gets berries. Here's a maybe crazy idea -- can you duct tape that maple trunk where it split? It will probably look like crap but it might help it heal.

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  5. WOW, love it all, so different from what I have growing down here in my tropical jungle. ;-)

    Have a great weekend and happy spring ~ FlowerLady

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    1. Sometimes I'm jealous of folks who live in year-round summer-like areas but when spring bursts forth with multitudes of blooming trees, blossoms and fresh green weeds carpet the ground and birdsong returns, I'm grateful to have experienced the lack of such things as it makes me appreciate them even more.

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  6. Hate to be a pessimist, but I doubt the acer will recover after all this time with the split drying out. Is there a chance that the right branch could become a leader if you pruned just above it?

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    1. You're probably right but since it's leafing out above the break and there's intact and healthy bark around part of the branch, I'll try taping it together to see what happens. I love an experiment.

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  7. I'm glad the time change and the lengthening daylight hours give you a chance to enjoy your garden after work, before the sun disappears. Spring's magic can't be limited to weekends. I love the Rhipsalis flowers.

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    1. I'm looking forward to retiring in 3 - 5 years and having lots more time to spend in the garden in the fall and spring!

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  8. Oh, we lost our daphne odoras, and now, seeing yours, I miss them. I do love seeing things pop out of the ground.

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    1. Daphnes, I'll never understand them - Healthy and happy one day, dead the next.

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  9. Your Rhipsalis is stunning, and it is wonderful to see that Sinopanax tolerated this past winter so well, perhaps it truly is hardy to the bottom of zone 8. Very much appreciate your sharing both plants that thrived and those that struggled!

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    1. As the season unfolds, more of what survived and what perished will become evident. Sinopanax is in one of the cooler spots in my garden where the snow melted off last. It was a surprise that it didn't suffer damage.

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  10. The Clivia look great. The Asian Podophyllum always look odd to me compared to regular old Mayapple.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.