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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Thursday, February 5, 2015

What's Happening In The Greenhouse?

There it is, hiding behind  bit of foliage.  Someone should really go out there and do some tidying up.


A  little closer.  

Let's see what's going on inside.  When Alison visited a couple of weeks ago, she noticed the beginning of a flower spike on the variegated Clivia.

Not to be outdone, the non variegated one is following suit.  

 I have lots of glass shelving but I hadn't thought of putting it between the rafters to make more space for plants below.

The rafters are fairly close together and this agapetes didn't appreciate being squeezed between them but seems happy not that it's there. Now, how are we going to get that back down?

I experimented by buying, for nearly nothing, some bulbs that were starting to sprout.  The  Hippeastrum  (Amaryllis) will not be producing blooms this year but I've had good luck keeping them for years so maybe next year we'll see some color.
 The paperwhites, purchased for the same nearly nothing, are looking great!

Amaryllis (Hippeastrum) purchased earlier have taken a bit longer in the cool greenhouse than they would have if they were inside.  It'll be interesting to see the buds open as I've forgotten which ones I got.

Here's the monkey puzzle tree branch that someone deposited in my yard after a storm earlier this year.  Would that all the "gifts" left were so nice. Mostly we get empty beverage cups, beer cans, the occasional used item of birth control, and miscellaneous drug paraphernalia.  All part of the rich tapestry of urban living.    

much to my surprise, the grocery store gardenia purchased before Christmas hasn't turned it's nose up and dropped all of its buds.  Rathr it's still producing blooms.

Impatiens 'Congo Cockatoo' never stops blooming.  You'd think it would want a break every now and then.

Jasminum officinale  that I got at 70% off at an end of the season sale clearance table at Fred Meyer is beginning to bloom.

As is Sonchus canariensis.  Yes, I've sprayed for those white things.  While it blooms every year, my specimen spends a great amount of time looking horrible for one reason or another.  



Jerusalem Cherry (either Solanum Capsicastrum or Solanum pseudocapsicum) still covered in fruit.

Cussonia paniculata that struggled along for several years seeming to be on the brink of death is finally looking happy.

Hyacinths, a recent purchase don't really count because I cheated but I forgot to order any in the fall and, well, that fragrance...

The experiment of bringing a Yucca 'Bright Star' inside to see if it would kep it from getting thos ugly brown spots seems to have worked.  However, because it isn't cold, it's also not developing the lovely pink tint.

And finally, this cute "mermaid pot" from Furney's Nursery makes me smile.  Now, what to put in it?

Only six more days until the public opening of the Northwest Flower and Garden Show!

30 comments:

  1. If I had that heads pot it would be a toss-up between Rhipsalis or Burro Tail Sedum. Rhipsalis is easier to manage.

    Wonderful tour. I am waiting to see which Amaryllis are going to bloom, too. Somehow the tags just work themselves out of the pots and it's always a celebration when somebody blooms.

    The Amaryllis that you think is not going to bloom might surprise you with a secondary bloom. Sometimes a nice fat bulb holds up to 3 bud stalks. ~ Pollyanna

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    1. I love Burro Tail and have it in another head pot. I've also a Rhipsalis that's in a plastic pot that would fit perfectly inside the planter! Thanks for the perfect suggestion.

      Dear Pollyanna, I like the way you think and will go home and tell that Amaryllis that it needs to produce another bloom stalk because you said so! That aught to make it happen!

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  2. 'Congo Cockatoo' is such a cute flower. My Bright Stars, which are outside, aren't very pink either, just a tiny touch at the tips. I wonder if it might be a good idea to just cover mine next winter with a little plastic to keep the rain off. They do get the blotches, but not as bad as some.

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    1. As the Bright Stars I have outside get larger and maybe further away from the ground, the spotting is gets less pervasive. Maybe the secret is to start with larger plants. On the other hand, I saw three small ones, planted in a raised bed with sharp drainage at Dig and they looked perfect. Not a brown spot in sight and the edges of the leaves were beautifully pink!

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  3. You're loving it aren't you? Having the greenhouse I mean. It's pretty wonderful. I wonder how it will affect your shopping this year?

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    1. It is fun and serves its purpose of storing all of the tender plants in one convenient location. For some reason I don't ever just sit and enjoy it. Like the garden, there's always something that needs to be done. It is a joy to have a place to potter around with plants in the winter.

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  4. Like a hidden treasure your greenhouse is, behind all those foliage :) the space above the rafters is an extra space rarely utilised, so good idea you've stored some plants up there. Okay a ladder will be needed but...

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    1. There is so very much room up there. One can fully stand up on top of the rafters as the pitch of the roof is much steeper than it appears in the pictures.

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  5. I just noticed that my Yucca 'Bright Star' was full of nasty spots. Love your greenhouse! Having a space like that as a retreat in the winter is so nice. I envy you.

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    1. You are more than welcome to retreat to my greenhouse any time!

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  6. How is it smelling in the greenhouse? Must be pretty sweet with some of those blooms...

    I'd be a bit nervous about using glass shelving up above, unless it were anchored and therefore unable to rain death upon me if bumped. Plexiglass! :)

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    1. One would think that it would be very sweet smelling but for some reason, not so much. It smells like a greenhouse, but the heavy fragrances seem not to carry as far in there as they do inside the house. Maybe heat is a factor as the greenhouse is kept at around 50 degrees.

      The glass shelves are mostly safety glass (two sheets sandwiching a thick tough plastic sheet. When broken, the shards stay together affixed to the plastic.

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  7. Like Alan, I was imagining the heady scent that must engulf you the minute you step into your lair.

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    1. Mostly smells green and clean but no strong floral fragrances. Bummer because I keep introducing them as I love them!

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  8. I'm glad you're enjoying your greenhouse. I have no doubt that the mermaid will acquire a coiffure in short order.

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    1. It is fun and I'll bet that you'll have a greenhouse one day fairly soon! She'll get one as soon as I get home!

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  9. Too bad the Jerusalem Cherry is poisonous. The fruit looks delightful.
    Nice placement of the puzzle tree branch and I love the Tillandsias display. Including the one hanging from the urchin!
    Impatiens 'Congo Cockatoo' ins't just pretty, but also tasty: someone's been munching on it's leafs!

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    1. From what the internet says, the fruit tastes very much like cherry tomatoes. Hmm. Lest you think of making a nice salad of them for someone of whom you're not fond, the internet says that the poison only causes stomach discomfort in humans.

      I noticed that the slugs seemed to enjoy the leaves. Oh well, that's what happens when the plants spend the summer outside.

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  10. What fun you are having filling your greenhouse with interesting plants. I always enjoy a tour. I think your mermaid would look nice with fern hair or succulents.

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    1. It is fun. I love your succulent of fern hair suggestion!

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  11. Your greenhouse is becoming a jungle. What fun you are having! blooms in the winter are a wonderful thing.

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    1. It was bound to happen. It's great fun indeed!

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  12. Sigh.... I want a greenhouse. Is the Jerusalem cherry edible or poisonous? What a wonderful jungle to come home to every day. :o)

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    1. You would do such wonderful things with a greenhouse! I hope you get one. Start hinting to Santa now! The Jerusalem cherry tastes very much like a cherry tomato and is poisonous. However, it only causes pain and digestive problems, not death so making Snow White a salad containing them would do little good. We'll have to stick with the good old poison apple thing.

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  13. Congo Cockatoo is a very exuberant flower with a very apt and entertaining name.

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  14. What an amazing variety of plants you have in your greenhouse, I like the way you have found more space by putting your plants on the rafters!

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    1. This summer, when many of the plants will be having a holiday outside, I'll be able to re arrange and get rid of some tables and add shelving to better use the vertical space but having a few plants in the rafters is always an option. The only problem is that one can't really see and enjoy the plants up there.

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  15. Hehe, I'm just thinking of when you got that Agapetes up there and then thought, "Huh, so how are we getting that back down?" I was afraid my discount Agapetes from Dragonfly was going to croak after being repotted and hauled to Wisconsin. One of the main roots died. But it's stopped dying back and is growing a little now.

    I love that picture with the monkey puzzle branch. It looks like a scene from some old workshop out of a story I read (which I can't think of now), until you notice the shiny black stereo.

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  16. Hopefully the agapetes won't grow too much before it goes outside for the summer. Glad to hear that yours is doing well!

    That workbench has been there for years and really needs to be replaced. Instead, it got a coat of paint.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.