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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day April 2015


Another month is half over already; can you believe it?  This is the time of year when I want time to go more slowly as there are so many things happening in the garden and so much that needs to be done!  Once again, Carol at May Dreams Gardens is hosting the floral fiesta which encourages garden bloggers from around the world to post what's blooming in their gardens on the fifteenth of each month.  Not only is it fun to see what's happening in other areas, once a blogger participates for several years, (s)he has a record of what has happened in his/her garden over a period of time.  It's a fun and painless way of creating a garden journal of sorts.   Here's a bit of what's blooming in my garden right now.

Fritillaria imperialis with the plant that can't be killed, Hyacinthoides hispanica (Spanish bluebells.)



Yes, they're weedy but I love them!  They're celebrated in lots of Victorian illustrations, painted on china, and are the state flower of Alaska, my home state. 

I do love a bit of floral schmaltz-

The Legend of the Forget-me-not

When to the flowers so beautiful
Father gave a name,
There came a blue-eyed one
All timidly it came
And standing at the Father’s feet,
And gazing in His face,
It said with low and timid voice,
And yet with gentle grace,
” Dear Lord, the name Thou gavest me,
Alas, I have forgot. ”
The Father kindly looked on him
And said, "Forget-me-not."




Magnolia laevifolia hasn't quite opened her fragrant blooms yet but will begin any day now.
 
Dicentra
Magnolias continue  

as do the camellias.

One of my favorites is this delicate pink that looks like a carnation.  All we need is a white sport coat and we'd be all dressed up for the dance.



Sorry for the horrible picture but I didn't feel like getting a ladder out to take a picture of  this rose, 'Joseph's Coat' which popped open in mid March!

Because of our mild winter, there was no die back on this fuchsia and the little white ballerinas are already dancing over my head.  You can look up their skirts that way.


An autumn impulse buy tulip from our local everything store.  
 The red rhododendron that blooms now and again in the fall just as I'm about to chop it down. 

 Scadoxus puniceus bloom is winding down.  This doesn't require a greenhouse in our climate but does need a dry place during the winter.

Petals have fallen from the sarracenias kept inside this winter, while buds are just forming on those outside.

This pelargonium (geranium) and the others in the greenhouse have bloomed all winter.  

Abutilon 'Red Tiger'  which came from M and N nursery at  the Northwest Flower and Garden Show. In case you're wondering, Abutilon megapotamicum  stopped blooming for a few weeks as it's putting energy into making lots of new foliage.  There are nice orange buds all over them though.
 Begonia 'Gene Daniels' has been blooming for a few months now. 

Uvularia

Fritillaria meleagris


Rhododendron 'President Roosavelt'

Pulmonaria.  Can't decide if the flowers or cool spotted foliage are the best part of this plant. 

Helleborus are taking on their aging colors while they set seed and grow new foliage. 

Paeonia delavayi lutea has seeded around a bit so I'll pot up the seedlings for the next plant exchange. 
 Ceanothus

 Ribes speciosum


 Matthiola something or other is a perennial fragrant stock that seeds around politely in dry areas.

Speaking of fragrant, what I think is Pittosporum tenuifolium which has made it through even the phormium killing winters (with a bit of damage) is blooming for the first time with these small nearly black blooms.  The fragrance wafts quite a distance and has had me seeking out the source of the wonderful olfactory treat.

Lastly, an update on Daffodil 'British Gamble' which is new to me this year.  The yellow fades a bit as the bloom ages and the trumpet becomes mostly peachy then the whole flower fades to a nice pink infused ivory color.  It's been blooming for four weeks now and I'm so glad I tried this beauty.  This picture was taken shortly after the flower opened. 
Also blooming but not pictured are various epimedium and trillium. 

Now, hop on over to Carol's blog to see what's blooming in gardens around the world!

Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day and Happy Spring!


36 comments:

  1. Wonderful show. I see things I need to check out as to growing conditions. Definitely Pelargoniums in my future.

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    1. The geraniums (Pelargoniums) have been so nice in there this winter, valiantly blooming along. Definitely welcome residents of the winter greenhouse!

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  2. Wow, fabulous blooms.
    The Spanish bluebells do actually look rather good underneath the Frit. I've been trying to pull them as soon as the leaves appear, every year. Never manage to get the bulb and still they keep going. The are threatening my population of native bluebells but I know I'll never get rid of them.

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    1. Thanks R.D. One year, I re dug an entire bed and thought I got every single clump of those Spanish bluebells, bulbs and all, out of there. Somehow, they're back and even more spread out than before. I enjoy the blooms and pull foliage and blooms up as soon as they're done which would kill any other bulb. Why aren't tulips this tenacious?

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  3. Wow! I am so regretting now not getting those Imperial Fritillaria bulbs in the ground last fall. This year for sure. Happy GBBD!

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    1. There's always next year. I surprised myself by getting every single bulb I bought in the ground this fall.

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  4. Happy GBBD Peter! I love the poem :) I'm really kicking myself that I haven't put in any Fritillaria yet. So pretty!!

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    1. Same to you, Jennifer! Glad you like the poem, I couldn't find an author other than Anon. Don't kick yourself, there'll be more Fritillaria bulbs at the nurseries this fall!

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  5. You have some lovely blooms. One of the great things about early spring is that every flower is still very special.

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    1. So true about spring! Some things that we might look over in the summer when there are so many blooms are very dear right now!

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  6. What a spectacular garden, Peter! I love this legend about Forget -me-not and stunning color of your rhododendron.
    Happy GBBD!

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  7. Exciting time of the year isn't it? And you have so many fabulous blooms!

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  8. That much beauty just overwhelms the senses!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!
    Lea

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    1. I'm very lucky to have so many lovely things in bloom right now.

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  9. Ah, you had me quite surprised with that Abutilon 'Red Tiger' - since mine from last year is deader than dead and definitely not blooming. Perhaps I'll pick up another this weekend at the sale...

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    1. M and N will definitely have them at Hortlandia! This has always been one of my faves but I've not tried wintering them over before due to lack of space and how much bugs like them. Alsion's blooming through most of the winter in her greenhouse made me think that I should have one as well.

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  10. Happy GBBD Peter! That Fritillaria meleagris almost looks checked in pattern. So cool. I also am a fan of Forget-me-nots. Thank you for sharing your beautiful garden with us once again.

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    1. It's always a pleasure to share my garden with folks as nice as you! The checked pattern on Fritillaria meleagaris is one of it's endearing qualities.

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  11. I love the Forget-me-not legend!

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    1. Someone once gave me a plate with hand painted forget-me-nots on it along with a card with that poem written in it. Very sweet.

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  12. What a showing of color, WOW! I agree with you I wish spring could go a little slower. I love the flowers of Abutilons. I had not really seen them till the Garden Bloggers Fling and now they are appearing in our market. I even found a Lucky Lantern® Abutilon Yellow-(‘NUABYELL’) that I have growing in a container. The Matthiola is lovely with the gray leaves and purple blooms. I planted Fritillaria meleagris but they haven't flowered so I am not sure they like it here. It was a gamble : ) Happy Bloom Day!

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    1. Happy Bloom Day, Laurin! Glad to hear that Abutilons are appearing in your market. They'd love you climate but do like a bit of water. We've been growing them here for many years!

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  13. What is the name of the fuchsia ballerinas? I need that one! Which is not to say that your entire parade of blooms is not lustworthy.

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    1. I'm not entirely sure but I think it's 'Hawkshead' http://www.monrovia.com/plant-catalog/plants/1676/hawkshead-hardy-fuchsia/ Although this looks a bit more pink than the pure white.

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  14. You have so many wonderful plants I can't even think of growing but we do share 'Joseph's Coat.' I LOVE that daffodil! I have to hunt down bulbs for that next fall. Happy GBBD, Peter!

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    1. Happy GBBD, Kris! It's a great daffodil! I got it from Van Engelen https://www.vanengelen.com/ because you can get good prices on large quantities of bulbs. I've always had good luck with them. Brent and Becky's (speaking of great product) https://brentandbeckysbulbs.com/ also sells them as do some other suppliers.

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  15. Ceanothus and Ribes speciosum! Great combo. Love the dark blooms on that pittosporum, too. Hey, can I get one of those Paeonia seedlings, please?!

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  16. Wow, so much is in bloom, and you have such variation. The forget-me-nots don't look weedy at all to me, it's funny how where you are can change a plant from weed status to desired plant.

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  17. Beautiful blooms. I have just bought a Magnolia laevigata what a gorgeous thing it is, you don' t see it very often. I have also bought Magnolia Elizabeth because you convinced me I really need it.

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  18. You've taken some beautiful photographs here. I particularly liked the bleeding heart and magnolia.

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  19. So many beautiful blooms! I would be happy to have some "weeds" like the forget-me-nots:).

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  20. Lots of great blooms! The Fritillaria with the background of Spanish Bluebells makes an excellent combination.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.