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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Meanwhile, Back in the Real World...

Since many of us are overwhelmed by the beauty of the fantasy gardens at the Northwest Flower and Garden Show recently, I thought it might be nice to present something on a more realistic scale.  While driving down the street the other day, this garden caught my eye.  Talk about small space gardening!
The combination of artifical and living plants was something one doesn't often see.  How else could one have a ficus and croton growing out of doors in zone 8? 
 
There are elements of this garden that I find delightful. The love of gardening is evident. (Although one wonders how many silkworms gave their lives for this.)



When the water feature is turned on, water pours out between the two metal bands at the top of the barrel. 
Just up the way, container gardening is alive and well!  You know, gardening and a passion for plants is something that we can all share to some extent or another.  I love the fact that this is a hobby for everyone and that we are all able to create our own vision of beauty.

But seriously girlfriend, those orange cones have got to go.  Or be turned upside down and be planted with something purple or maybe blue.   

31 comments:

  1. Interesting....the love of some plants is there though. At least the plastic plants provide evergreen structure in the winter :)

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    1. Rosemary Verey was a strong proponent of gardens having year round interest. I'm wondering, though if this lesson in winter structure came from the many examples at Sissinghurst.

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  2. Speechless and biting my tongue but best to stick with speechless.

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    1. Isn't it wonderful when gardens provoke such visceral responses? It must have something to do with our reliance on plants for survival and the relationships we've built with them on other levels as well.

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  3. Interesting contrast with the show gardens. Gardening for everyone with water feature, windmill, arbor, yucca. Basically all you need in any size space.

    The cones were clearly put in after the fact, well after the fact from the looks of the white pot with the plant now growing upright.

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    1. This shows what one can do if (s)he has longer than 72 hours to throw a garden together. There is a settling in, a patina if you will, that comes with a garden created over time.(or is that algae?)

      A variety of strategies for shedding rain are utilized in rainy witer areas, the sideways pot repels water from the root zone while allowing the plant to receive ample light - genius. Perhaps this was the precursor to the topsy turvy planter which is "turning the world of gardening upside down."

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  4. haha!! once again you have brightened my morning - those cones! While horrific, I totally see the inspiration. someone with a heart (and spare moolas) should gift them a windmill palm.

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    1. The cones might be there to keep folks from driving in the garden space. Live plants require so much more care than silk ones.

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  5. Seriously, Traffic Cone Orange is so 2012.

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    1. Unless it's mixed with chartreuse, then it's totally early 2013.

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  6. You are a brave man. Was Tom parked near by ready to rescue you should a resident start to question your intentions?

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    1. I was alone, parked and walked. Either no one was home or I didn't look very dangerous.

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  7. My goodness, that is quite the contrast from your Garden show posts. However, I fully agree with you that a common love of plants, and growing things is really what it's all about and how that is internalized by the individual is what makes gardeners such unique specimens. Cheers, Jenni

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    1. It's the urge to garden that thrills me. Both a kindergartener's marigold grown in a styrofoam cup and the gardens at Kew can feed a gardener's spirit.

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  8. Oh, I could so see those orange cones planted with something purple or blue! I wish you had captured the barrel water feature running, it looks interesting. That shot, in fact, kind of has a "Jungle Fever" vibe to it!

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    1. I think we should design a series of traffic cone compositions for next year's FWFGS! That water feature part of the garden was pretty interesting!

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  9. so-o-o-o funny tog, There must be a planet somewhere that has orange cones with blue and and purple plants growing in them! Those gardens you show are more interesting than those expensive.gardens that are boringly similar status symbols for the owner.

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    1. They certainly are unique and interesting gardens.

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  10. Remember, artificial plants add four seasons of interest to your mixed borders!

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    1. You make an often-overlooked benefit of this kind of gardening.

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  11. I admire how determined they are to create a garden. That's what's the most beautiful. :o)

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  12. Wow! There are so many different gardens in this world. That's all I say..;O) Happy weekend, Peter!

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    1. Yes, many different gardens.;O) Sending warm thoughts your way!

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  13. Outlaw, firstly it has seemed to me that just it's a mess. but then I saw there was a design but I did not understand it.
    Have a nice weekend!

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    1. It's a mystery! I hope you enjoy your weekend, too and may the warm breezes of sprig be with you soon!

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  14. They must have had people driving in their garden to put the orange cones there. I laughed at the combination of artificial and real plants. It reminds me of a gardener I knew. She could grow anything, and I was always amazed at her beautiful garden. One day, I saw something absolutely beautiful blooming - and it was winter! I asked her what they were, as I wanted some myself. She laughed and said, "oh, they're fake. I just wanted something pretty out there, so I planted those!" haha After that, I looked a little closer at her plants before I asked for their identification! :)

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    1. That's funny! We all enjoy winter color in the garden and that's surely one way to attain it! Happy Weekend to you!

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  15. I love these very personal gardens that do not follow or care about any design rules. To me they are much more interesting than a perfectly manicured and paid for landscape. There are several in my neighborhood like this trailer garden, but have not yet found the nerve to photograph them. One day.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.