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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Rare Plant Research 2; The Place

From the Rare Plant Research "About Us" page come these words:

"Burl Mostul founded Rare Plant Research, a specialty nursery, in 1987.  In the early years the nursery focused on plant research, collector plants and varieties new to science.  About ten years ago the nursery shifted focus to garden plants and now Burl travels the world looking for new plants as well as developing new hybrids for Northwest gardeners."

The nursery where we saw all the cool plants in yesterday's post is behind us and the driveway, house, and vineyard are before us.

"Rare Plant Research is open to the public only one or two weekends a year and [this] thas become an event attracting 1,000 or more people.  In 2008 Burl and his wife built a stone chateau modeled after a 12th century Romanesque church, surrounded by ponds and gardens featuring many rare and unusual tropical and temperate plants.  The most recent addition is a bromeliad garden filled with boulders, olive trees and landscape bromeliads."


The vintage Jaguar is on loan for the nursery open but it looks great with the house!

I beg your forgiveness for including so many pictures of this place but there were visual treats at every turn.  It was difficult to narrow this down from the many images I took.  Isn't digital photography fun?

 So, we're in the soggy pacific northwest, right?


 This is a place made for entertaining!  The gardens are available for rent for special occasions.  

I'm thinking an early evening wedding here, reception happening as dusk descended, would be very special!


The steps are wide enough to accommodate chairs.  String quartet in the gazebo?





I'd love to come back and see this combination once the Tradescantia fills in.  Stunning!


A comfortable place to relax.  I could get used to sipping my morning coffee here.  How about you?


I understand that this interior solarium has just been added. 

Note the Musa 'Ai Ai' I'm picturing that door going to a bedroom.  How amazing would it be to awaken and see the Pacific Northwest out one window and the tropics out of another?

 A little wine makes any garden visit more interesting.  This space, a wine tasting room,  is perfect for lots of people but I'd be tempted to have more space for plants.  Who am I kidding?  There's no space for people in my garden.  It works well for a curmudgeon who likes plants more than people most of the time.




 Every 12th century church needs a moat, right? 

 Loree noticed the tree on the right.  It's an Aesculus hipposcastanum 'Laciniata'  which I just got at Hortlandia earlier this year.  You may recall it from this post.

 This specimen must be quite old as I've heard that they are extremely slow growers. 

More eye candy.

This moat doesn't look deep and wide enough to drown would-be intruders. I'm imagining that modern laws don't allow for the drainage of sewage into moats anymore.  Our noses are grateful.



The dense evergreen background makes one quite aware that we're in the PNW!

Another of the ponds. 



A garden shed. 


 Those silly Romans left debris everywhere.  I guess there weren't laws about littering a few centuries ago.




Hope you enjoyed our visit and plan to see it for yourself!  
Exciting news  from RPR's website - "We are having a special one day open garden and nursery plant sale, June 21st from 11am to 4pm.  Join us for lunch with caterer Dave Clark's tasty creations, wine tasting with Villa Catalana Cellars in the garden conservatory tasting room.  Tour the gardens and enjoy a glass of pinot noir.

24 comments:

  1. Thank you for including the display of Tradescantia -- I still like the old name of Setcreasea. This is another of those common plants that I like to spread around like marmalade in an uncommon way. It's root hardy here, does that apply in the PNW?

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    1. It has been root hardy for me in mild winters but if it gets much below 25 not so much. It is a beautiful plant though and I love growing it.

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  2. Oh my, there aren't superlatives enough! I love everything about this. I especially love that urn with the Foxtail fern with the succulents... wonderful. Those terraces are gorgeous and what a view! I could move right in there, TFS

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    1. Isn't it amazing? I'd be happy living in the shed!

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  3. No forgiveness necessary for all the pics! How amazing is this place?!? I'm a huge fan of stone-built structures - and that "garden shed" REALLY caught my fancy...

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    1. They used an interesting process that I don't remember fully but I think the stone is a facade. Whatever it is, it certainly is gorgeous!

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  4. I've read and heard of this place so many times before but it still captures my attention every time I see it featured on blogs. And I never tire looking at pics of it. Thanks for sharing and would love to see this place in the flesh one day!

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    1. It is a very special place and I was so glad that I went!

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  5. Beautiful place, your tours there are wonderful and that shed is just amazing!

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    1. So much fun! It was almost like being in Italy!

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  6. Your pictures turned out so fabulous! And your post really gives people a good strong idea of what the place is all about. Well done. I enjoyed seeing it with you and Loree that day.

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    1. That was a glorious day especially since we had GPS to help us find our way!

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  7. Great photos Peter! And that garden shed, where was it? I've never, in all my visits, seen that. Nice find!

    So will you be returning on the 21st?

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    1. Thanks Loree! The shed was on the shore of the pond above the main one. Sort of behind and above the house if I'm remembering correctly.

      I'm thinking of it but there are several things also happening on that day do don't know.

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    2. Several things, including this: http://www.colvoscreekdesigns.com

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    3. I hadn't heard. Sad to see them go! We're supposed to hear Jamie Durie speak at Windmill that morning.

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  8. The focus on details is tremendous. I love the views through the arches. thanks for sharing your tour!

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    1. I am in awe of Burl and his vision! It's always fun to share such cool places!

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  9. Oh, I suppose it's OK for those who like stone, water, and views.

    Ha ha! This place is magnificent. The Old World look is surprisingly authentic looking and fits in with the site quite nicely. I LOVE that succulent urn and the arched gate. So many nice details.

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    1. Yeah, it might work for folks like that. I can't imagine having the vision to make that all happen! Pretty cool.

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  10. What an amazing tour! Not too many pictures at all Peter, they are all terrific. They sure got the "12the century look" down. I was particularly envious of the couple sitting on the dock enjoying a drink or some food. The seem floating in their own world. Exquisite landscape!

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    1. Glad you enjoyed it! We sure had a blast!

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  11. WOW...I can only say wow!! this place is awesome!

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.