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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Monday, December 3, 2012

A Nice Walk on a Brisk Autumn Day

So, what should we do when the sun is out, there's no wind and the temperature soars to 5 degrees f?  Why go for a nice walk on the Palmer Hay Flats to see Reflection Lake of course. 
 
 

Because the mountains are so high and at this time of the year, the sun doesn't climb too far up, parts of this area don't see direct sunlight for three to four months of the year.  O.K. you can see the sunlight way up there but it doesn't actually reach all the way down to parts of the flats.


I thought that the hoar frost on all the trees was stunning but was told that this was just moderate frost.  That when it's really thick the tiniest ray of light causes everything to glitter.

You can tell that it's still quite warm out because on the lake there's a small spot  over there on the left that isn't completely frozen yet.   I bet that the reflections that give this lake its name are probably better when it's not frozen and covered with snow.  Just a guess.

Frost Flowers

Hope you enjoyed our walk and remembered to keep your camera against your body inside your coat so that it didn't freeze and refuse to work. I just love these cool crisp autumn days, don't you?

24 comments:

  1. Thanks for taking us along, that was a very picturesque walk!

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    1. It's always a pleasure to have you along!

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  2. Beautiful! I wish we got conditions like that once in a while...so many great photo opportunities! Hey, and it would give me a chance to break out my pea coat I brought with me from Nebraska (hope it still fits)!

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    1. It is pretty but that would mean that we couldn't grow a lot of cool plants. Love the way pea coats look. Maybe in a few years, you'll acclimate more and actually find Portland winters cold enough to wear yours.

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  3. Stunning! The frost flowers are really great. I hope you had a warm jacket. I was considering the thermal underwear in our 50f just yesterday. It took three shirts a wool sweater and two jackets to get me outside :P

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    1. Well, I carry around a great deal of personal insulation at all times but I did have a coat, gloves and a hat as well.

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  4. Absolutely gorgeous! Love that frost.

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  5. Wonderland! How beautiful! What a wonderful part of the world!

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    1. It was a thrill to be back in Alaska for a while.

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  6. You've taken fine pictures! For some reason I still prefer your sunny flower pictures...Can you quess, why? ;O) ( A:I live in the middle of snow and coldness.)

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    1. I could still take pictures of flowers but we've entered our wet time of the year and sun is fairly rare now. Never fear, spring is near.

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  7. Your shots of the mountains are fabulous, so cold and forbidding. I love it when the sunlight turns the frost to diamonds :)

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    1. I wish I could take credit but the scenery was so beautiful that all one has to do is point the camera in any direction and push the button.

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  8. Best tour of Alaska since the movie Never Cry Wolf.

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    1. Funny you should mention that. Never Cry Wolf was filmed a few miles up the road from my home town!

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  9. Amazing mountains. Something we miss out here in the flatlands.

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    1. The praries have their own beauty. One is more likely to have a house fall on him/her in yor area, though.

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  10. Beautiful Pics! I love your mountains!

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    1. Thanks. Alaska is a place of rugged beauty!

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  11. I just love a heavy frost. I know, you say that is moderate but it sure is pretty. Where are you gardening? Zone 8 is a lucky zone!

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    1. My garden is in western Washington State in Tacoma. I was born in Vermont, raised in Alaska and moved to Washington about 25 years ago. Having gardened in a zone 3-4 area, I am still amazed at the wide range of plants that survive here.

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  12. As I'm wont to say when we have temps around here drop down in the low 40s, "Burr-sy freaking worr-sy." For this post I would be more inclined to say, "It's colder than a well-digger's ass.

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    1. But it was a dry cold so it felt different from our Pacific Northwest wet cold. The news guy says we'll be having highs in the upper 30's in a couple of days. YIKES, that's cold!

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.