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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Wednesday Vignette

Wednesday Vignette is hosted by Anna at Flutter and Hum.  Click on the link to join in the fun!

Back in June, visiting Cornell Nursery in Portland, I admired this new area of their garden.  The raised beds of Corten steel contrast nicely with the decomposed granite (or something like that.)

Oh to be able to exercise such restraint and not crowd every inch of soil with plants.

12 comments:

  1. Love both those materials. Can only dream of being able to afford Corten steel in my garden.

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  2. The wide expanse of rusty steel is beautiful, but a little too sterile. At first, I admired it, but then I thought the bench looked lonely. I would at least put a couple of pots, or a cluster of pots on each side of it. In time, I bet some self-sown plants, like maybe Mexican feather grass, will pop up in that DG. It's a nice shot!

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  3. Haha - that Corten thing is like telling people that fall is the best time to plant. People simply don't believe you!

    In order to function in a truly weather resistant way, Corten requires dry and wet cycles and air circulation. When you use Corten for planters, they will obviously be full of soil and plants, and won't get those required cycles of wet/dry conditions. Eventually, like all other steel, they will decay. So, for planters, you might as well use regular mild steel - which prices out at about half that of Corten. I wrote more about this on The Creative Flux a few years ago - you can read it here if you like.
    https://thecreativeflux.wordpress.com/2015/02/11/what-exactly-is-cor-ten-and-is-it-worth-it/

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    1. This is tested and true? Reading now...

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  4. I would love to have that type of raised bed in my garden. I love the re-purposed look. It would make a great privacy wall near the pool. (Look at me planning a project I will never be able to afford...)

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  5. I don't have that kind of restraint either. The only times my beds are that open is when the stuff I planted dies.

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  6. i liked these too
    and did you notice the cool chicken coop?

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    1. I don't remember if we saw the chicken coop or not. That does it, I must return to Portland!

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  7. Oh, I like this! It makes me feel relaxed. I think I'd add a few more pots...and maybe an edible garden over there...and a native perennial plot in that other area... Yes, restraint is tough. And tidiness is even tougher--especially adjacent to an Oak forest in the fall. Good heavens, the leaves falling...hard time of year for me!

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  8. Love raised beds too Peter. My back is thankful to them.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.