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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Monday, April 14, 2014

Visiting Valley Nursery

Last weekend we went on a little nursery hop on the Kitsap Peninsula.  It's a beautiful drive but we only had time to visit three nurseries this time as we lingered and enjoyed something special at each of them.  First up was Valley Nursery in Poulsbo.  This is a full service, large nursery with lots to see and buy.  There are always some imaginative and interesting planted up containers for sale.  What fun hostess gifts these would make, they're less expensive than a bottle of wine, and last longer than cut flowers.  Fun!
 
One surprise was that talented photographer, knowledgeable plant person, author of Rainy Side Gardeners, funny lady, and friend Debbie Teashon, is now working at Valley.  This was only a surprise because someone doesn't keep up with facebook the way he should. 
 
Grevillea 'Ned Kelley' was tempting as I love it but killed mine this winter by bringing it inside when it got cold (good) and then forgetting to water it until it was mostly brown (bad.)  I'll have to love you from afar Ned, as I'm clearly too neglectful a plant parent to deserve you.


Some of the staff were taking turns having their picture taken standing on the bench on the right and peering into this dracaena.
 
They showed me that the excitement was this - it was about to bloom!  For some of you, this may be a regular occurrence but in these parts, it's unusual. 
 
 
Another fun event was Dan Hinkley's talk about his favorite plants for this climate.  Being a Monrovia-sponsored event, he spoke mostly about many of the "Dan Hinkley, Plant Explorer Collection" released by Monrovia but also threw in plugs for some of his other faves.  The nursery was very well stocked with the Monrovia offerings and it was interesting to watch the attendees of the talk march out and stock up on the plants about which Mr. Hinkley so entertainingly spoke.
 
Disporum longistylum 'Green Giant' has white flowers followed by blue/black berries but the emerging foliage is very decorative by itself!

To see more of the Hinkley Collection, go here.
 
Remember the pictures of Magnolia 'Blushing Belle' from our Vassey visit?  Here's one at Valley that's just past her prime.  The watermelon pink color is still lovely.  Here are some images of the thing in full bloom.


One of my Yucca Gloriosas did this beautiful color shift this year; others in the same bed did not, nor did any of my Y. 'Bright Star' that have in the past.  Many nurseries have Y. 'Bright Star' in the same size and color intensity this spring.  All from one big grower?  Anybody know the secret of the beautiful pink color shift?  I've heard that it has to do with cold temps and light exposure.

This bromeliad really wanted to come home and join the collection in my music room but (O.K. they're all plant rooms now but have been given names to differentiate which plant room is which.)  Maybe this should be the bromeliad room with the instruments in it.

Xerosicyos danguyi looks like one of those plants that would be happy baking in a sunny window and growing over the years to take over a room.


Here kitty.  We'll name this one envy.
(Because it's green.)

Warning!  Broken pots should be repaired, half buried in the ground or discarded immediately  or dwarves, elves, leprechauns, lighthouse building fairies or other garden pests may take up residence and you'll have to decide on a method for dealing with them.

Won't this look great when it's completely rusted?

Repurposing of garden tools?  Looks like they may have been made just for this but there are some interesting ideas for do it yourselfers who have broken tools.  Who says that gardeners don't have hang ups?
 
Visit Valley's site here, see previous posts about them here and have a happy new week wherever you are!  

25 comments:

  1. I love the green kitty! My Bright Star occasionally gets pink tips on the leaves, but nothing like what I've seen on yours and Loree's blog. I'd love to know how they do it. I'm a big fan of broken pots in the garden, but not of decorating them with full-scale miniature gardens. Although I can see those mini gardens being great for people with big hardscape dreams and little money. It's a way to make paths and buildings without hurting your back or your pocketbook!

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    1. Does this mean I should save my broken pots for you Alison?

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    2. I actually like miniature gardens and enjoy the way people create tiny worlds, just don't want to start doing it myself or I'd start collecting even more stuff and we all know that would be a really bad idea!

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  2. Very cool, someone you know turns up working at a nursery. I thought your Dracaena was a Nolina nelsonii...though the forming blooms said otherwise. Or I need glasses for more than just night driving...

    Getting a kick out of everyone wearing coats, too!

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    1. Oh David, I'm glad that the coat wearing amuses you as we're weary of it. Today is supposed to reach the high sixties! In this area, the shorts and sandals come out as soon as it hits 55. Happy Monday!

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  3. Oh sad news about your grevillea! Reminds me I need to go check on mine to see if it needs water (thank you!)...

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    1. It's o.k. some plants are meant to be enjoyed in other gardens. One can't grow everything, right.

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  4. I blame the dwarves for the damage. Like termites for stone.

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    1. Or do you think they simply enjoy a little pot tipping during the night. You know, you can't trust anyone these days!

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  5. Like David, I thought nolina when I saw the dracaena photo. Another fun tour with your commentary. New tools made to copy recycled ones is a concept that needs considering, but then I already have my own hang ups.


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    1. I like stealing the idea to use with broken tooks that we already have. Heaven knows that I'll never get to it but it's fun to think about it.

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  6. I love the flower color of that Grevillea and may nab one the next time I see it in the nursery, even if I can't currently think where I'd put it. My Yucca 'Bright Star' are showing quite a bit of pink variation after a few months in the ground but I'm not sure I can tell you why - maybe the cool nights combined with very warm daytime temps? The one with the most pink was dug up by a raccoon at one point - maybe they like the stress of having their roots in fresh air?

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    1. I think that you're right about the cold nights coupled with sunny days along with some other stress. My most brightly colored one is in the worst soil in my garden. Not willing to have racoons in to dig up any to test your other theory!

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  7. I love Envy's shade of green! Daniel Hinkley will be visiting the UK soon to do a series of talks. Not sure yet but we're hoping to make it to one of them.

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    1. It is a beautiful color! Dan is a very entertaining speaker and has a vast knowledge of plants. I hope you're able to hear and meet him!

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  8. Intrigued by that Dracaena, it looks like a Nolina or Cordyline australis too.

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    1. It's probably Cordyline australis or C. indivisa which are both sold here as "dracena spikes" but indeed aren't dracenas at all. I just forget sometimes and call them that.

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  9. Gorgeous photography, you captured the flower of Ned Kelly beautifully.

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    1. Thanks Karen! Ned is very photogenic. I am in love with many of your native plants

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  10. I don't know if I'll get to this nursery, but I'll keep it in mind if we get over to the peninsula. We did vist several nurseries this weekend that you told me about on your blog. You'll see once I get time to get my post up.

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    1. I hope you had fun visiting the nurseries and look forward to your post!

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  11. Nice plants and accessories too. And how fun to run into Debbie there!

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    1. It was a great visit for lots of reasons!

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  12. Dan is a great plant spokesman. I'm sure he could get people to buy almost anything with his stamp of approval.

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    1. You're right! If he pointed out the delicate daisy-like blooms, light green goodness, and delicate stems of chickweed, there'd be a line to buy it!

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.