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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

April 2014 Foliage Follow-Up

Each month on the day after Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day, the inspirational Pam Penick  at Digging hosts Foliage Follow-Up, a garden blogging meme to remind us all of the importance of foliage in our gardens. Flowers are pretty but foliage is forever. Click on the link above to see gorgeous greens from around the world!

Spring is an explosion of exciting foliage so instead of even pretending to have a theme, I just let the camera lead me around. 

Meconopsis paniculata foliage looking gorgeous in the sun!  Can't wait to see a mature rosette of this gorgeous plant?  Go here.  This is an easy Meconopsis and the golden glow of that foliage...sigh! 


Astilboides tabularis leaves looking a little rumpled as they unfurl.  Soon they'll cover the ripening foliage of the galianthus.  Probably best not to point out that hedera helix leaf in the  bottom center of the picture.  One would think I'd pull a weed or two before taking pictures.

Acer palmatum 'Ukigumo' has survived three years for me so maybe it'll decide to stay on permanently.

Pieris Japonica 'Forest Flame'


Syneilesis palmata adding some more growth to the tall stalks behind that emerged earlier.

Very excited to have this specimen of Schefflera  delavayi from Gossler Farms (Portland Yard Garden and Patio Show)   The leaf margins are not as deeply incised as some I've seen (watch for aan upcoming post!) but are more so than my other S. delavayi.


Acer pseudoplatanus 'Esk Sunset'  

Golden hops vine  seems like a good idea at this time of year before it starts trying to conquer the world. 

Since I read Alison's post with pictures of Rhododendron 'Super Flimmer' a year ago, I've been smitten by this plant but hadn't seen one until we visited Hortlandia, the Hardy Plant Society of Oregon's amazing plant sale (post to come soon.)  Unfortunately it got a little sunburn on top while in the car but it'll be fine!  Evergreen foliage that seems to glow from within.  Perfect for a shady spot!

Hoover Boo and Loree posted about this new Alstromeria 'Rock and Roll'  Both Alison and I wanted one and Loree pointed us to Portland Nursery to get them.  Sources disagree about hardiness 8? 8b? 9?  It may stay in a pot and come in during the coldest part of the winter.  (Screaming orange/red flowers - don't tell Pam I mentioned the "F" word!)

Hosta 'White Feather' is another Hortlandia find.

Tulip ' Fire of Love' has a tag that says it's a perennial bulb.  I sure hope so!  It's a Greigii and they usually stick around for a while.  Just found that Brent and Becky's Bulbs sells these!  I'm seeing many of these being planted in my garden this fall!

From a recent trip to Dragonfly Farms Nursery came this Pyrrosia lingua 'Hiryu' which had just arrived from Japan!
 All of these new plants are sitting near the back door where I pass them several times a day so they got a lot of attention in this post.  Agave americana 'Cornelius' has been very expensive when I've seen it before.  On our recent visit to Portland, Cistus had them on sale for about a fifth of the price of the others I'd seen.  Since the danger gardenette is moving to a larger, newly cleared-out area, I'll be able to find space for this beauty!

This hosta has nifty undulating leaves that emerge a little differently form their smoother-leafed peers.


Elated that I didn't kill Sinopldophyllum hexandrum  (Far Reaches last year.) It Is Alive!

Old friend Devil's Club, Oplopanax horridus, makes my Alaskan relatives laugh as there it is cut down all of the time.  It's pretty well-behaved, has huge leaves, (a good gunnera substitute in cold winter areas) and produces a nice cluster of white flowers followed by striking red berries.  Probably a good idea to plant it a bit away from paths as the sensory experience of brushing against it isn't pleasant.

What foliage has caught your attention this month? 

30 comments:

  1. I've been watching for my Sinopodophyllum, but so far nothing. My other Podophyllums have been up for a while.We now have a lot of the same plants, but fortunately there is so much gorgeous foliage in both our gardens, that we don't end up repeating each other. I am always amused by devil's club, I have one little plant in the farthest corner of my garden, that so far has been coming back every year.

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    1. Mine was way behind the Podophyllums and it's in a pot so the soil probably warmerd faster than one that might be in the ground. Devil's club is a great native plant & I look forward to seeing yours!

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  2. Peter,l liked this Acer pseudoplatanus 'Esk Sunset', the foliage is very nice. You always show us interesting plants! Also liked gunnera, think it will survive in our climate.

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    1. 'Esk Sunset' is a beautiful maple! I'm glad you liked my plants. Gunnera won't live in your climate but Oplopanax horridus surely would as it lives in Alaska.

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  3. I spied that white hosta at the sale and was intrigued. Good to see you got one. I've been camping near my cut-leaf emperor oak, waiting for the fat buds to pop open. I can't wait to see the foliage.

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    1. You were wise to pass it up as the white doesn't last and once it turns green, I've heard that it's a rather uninteristing character that is a slug magnet best grown in a pot. Still that ghostly white foliage probably lasts as long or longer as some flowers in the garden so... Love me some cut-leaf emperor oaks & noticed the same leaf difference in the two specimens that you posted about.
      We'll be listening up this way for the squeals of glee when you see your first oak leaves emerge!

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  4. After reading posts like yours and Alison's, I think I like foliage follow-up day even better than bloom day. Those of you in the PNW certainly have lots of beautiful foliage to work with!

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    1. We are very lucky to live where we do and have such gorgeous foliage. Funny, we still lust after lots of your cool plant choices!

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  5. I'll have to take note of some of these plants, we're off to Port Townsend next month, which means….Far reaches nursery !!!!

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    1. Dragonfly Farms and Celestial Dream Gardens are on the way to Port Townsend and well worth the slight detour. Of course, Valley Nursery and Savage Plants that can be fun too!

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  6. You have so many gorgeous foliage plants there Peter that could easily bump up our wishlist! Acer 'Ukigomo' particularly caught my eye, hope you let it stay :)

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    1. Acer 'Ukigomo' is amazing and I would never think of not letting it stay as it's finally found a location that it loves. The leaves emerge very white making the tree appear as if it's blooming. Over the summer, the leaves take on a bit of green but it's a stunning tree still. Ukigumo means floating clouds and describes the tree well! You need one to brighten a shady spot!

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  7. The best way to get tulips to come back is to plant them somewhere that is bone dry in the summer. One can also lift them and store them over the summer, but that's a lot of trouble.

    Deirdre

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    1. Mine are largely under deciduous trees whose roots grab any moisture available. The summer plants that grow there are drought tolerant and I don't often water those areas in the summer so that might be the bone dry in summer thing. I've read about lifting and storing them but am far too lazy to contemplate such an exercise!

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  8. Oh, that 'Fire of Love' mottling is stupendous. Last night I saw some pictures taken by a guy who visited Brent and Becky's farm in Virginia. He says they are fabulous people and their place is amazing.

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    1. It is gorgeous tulip foliage! Doesn't surprise me at all about Brent and Becky's as plant people are usually the nicest sorts of folks!

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  9. As you know I was focused on trees, but I do love all of the fleshy stalks poking out of the ground now. So much is going on in the garden.

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    1. Spring brings with it an embarassment of riches!

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  10. I love your variegated plants, especially the Japanese Maple 'Ukigumo', the red twigs are so cute, I like the ones that develop a pink blush to the leaves. I enjoyed meeting you finally at Hortlandia, I forgot my camera then after a while I realized I should try out my new smart phone for photos, too late to get your photo but I did take some plants. I forgot to get names for some pottery displays, maybe you will have them, you are good at that.

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    1. I have the name of one of the potters but I was so excited by all of the plants that I forgot to be very thorough about picking up cards and didn't take many photos either because the sale was so amazing! It was great to finally meet you too!

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  11. Ukigumo and Super Flimmer caught my eye as well. Love them. I keep meaning to join in on foliage follow-up, but just couldn't drag myself out to take pictures today.

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    1. Some days are just like that. It's all good.

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  12. Wow, that first picture! And then the second, and the third! So many great foliage pictures this month, Peter. And it looks like you scored with that Cornelius agave acquisition.

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    1. We've got such a wealth of gorgeous foliage right now - It's a grand time and place to be a gardener!

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  13. A feast for the eyes, especially that hairy poppy catching the sunlight.

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    1. You should find some for your garden. The sight of them in winter will change your life!

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  14. What a truly wonderful selection of foliage you have in your garden. The poppy caught my attention because I grow Meconopsis Lingholm, the blue poppy and the leaves are so hairy just like the one you grow, is yours difficult?

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    1. This is very easy and can be grown even by beginners. No blue flowers though.

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  15. Ohh so many wonderful foliage, I wish I could find such a large range of plants here. But I enjoy seeing yours!

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    1. It's an incredible region of the world as far as diversity of foliage. We can grow a wider variety of plants in the Pacific Northwest than anywhere else on the planet except for the tropical rain forests.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.