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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Wednesday Vignette - Whispering Hope


Wednesday Vignette is hosted by the multi-talented Anna at Flutter and Hum.  To see her WV and those of other participating bloggers, click here

I let my artichokes bloom as they're so beautiful in flower.  The spent blooms remain ornamental through the winter.  Two years ago, as the new growth emerged from the ground, I cut the seed heads but they still looked interesting so I threw this one in a pot where it sat all summer.  With the recent arrival of so much rain in our big storms, the seeds must have thought it was time to start growing. 

Isn't nature wonderful?  From decay and death comes new life.  There's always hope.  Of course, these will probably freeze to death unless I take them inside the greenhouse, but I digress.

Soft as the voice of an angel
Breathing a lesson unheard,
Hope with a gentle persuasion
Whispers her comforting word;
Wait till the darkness is over, 
Wait till the tempest is done,
Hope for the sunshine tomorrow,
After the shower is gone.

Whispering hope, oh how welcome thy voice
Making my heart in it's sorrow rejoice.

If in the dimness of twilight,
Dim be the region afar,
Will not the deepening darkness
Brighten the glimmering star?
Then when the night is upon us, 
Why should the heart sink away?
When the dark midnight is over,
Watch for the breaking of day.

Whispering hope, oh how welcome thy voice
Making my heart in it's sorrow rejoice.

                    -Septimus Winner, 1868

I do love schmaltz.  In case you missed the big hit of this duet in 1949 (Released as a 78 record.) Here's a recording. 


17 comments:

  1. That looks so cool! I've had that happen with other seedheads. I always let my cardoons flower too.

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    1. I love it when that happens. In my former garden, I had a Centaurea macrocephala (the yellow one) whose seed heads would do this reliably.

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  2. That's crazy! So...did you take it into the greenhouse? And how are your Tetrapanax bloom buds looking?

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    1. I didn't take the seed head into the garage as I don't know where I'd put any more artichokes. Tetrapanax look o.k. so far. The leaves were a bit droopy this morning but perked up when the temperature rose a bit. How are yours doing?

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  3. Neat! Nice to see some signs of new life at this time of year. I had to look it up to confirm, but artichokes originated in the Mediterranean. A lot of plants from that area germinate in fall. I've got Matthiola fruticulosa ssp. perennis 'Alba' seedlings coming up in the greenhouse, but I also scattered some in the garden and I've started seeing those ones come up, too.

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    1. Good to know that they make it if they're accustomed to sprouting now. Love Matthiola fruticulosa and had Alba reseed around for several years. A few years ago I got a purple variety that seems more vigorous but not as fragrant.

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  4. In 1959, the sister we called Tanky [Frances] and Reverend Howe wwew singing this same song. I take this whole post as a personal message. Thank you.

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    1. I'm glad to know that the song spoke to you!

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  5. I've never considered leaving my artichoke blooms out in the winter garden. But, I will from now on. So cool!

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    1. This one is two years old and pretty beat up but they are glorious the first winter.

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  6. Well, I guess I love schmaltz too because I sure enjoyed listening to that recording!
    The sprouting artichoke is way cool.
    I have noticed many things sprouted this fall, apparently having produced seed during the drought, and tricked into thinking it was spring when the rains returned.

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    1. This year's hot dry summer did some strange things to plants!

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  7. Happy Thanksgiving Peter! I hope some of those little seedlings make it to the greenhouse for next year :)

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    1. Happy Thanksgiving to you! We'll see if they make it through the night tonight but I don't know where I'd put more artichoke plants.

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  8. I'm a sucker for schmaltz too. The poem hit the spot in light of world events. Happy Thanksgiving Peter! And I hope you took the artichoke sprouts under cover.

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    1. Glad you enjoyed it, Kris! I'm so lazy that those poor sprouts might just perish.

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  9. Very cool. I like schmaltz, too.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.