-

-
Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Monday, July 7, 2014

The Garden of Peggy and Bill Fox

Meanwhile, back on the Northwest Perennial Alliance Gig Harbor garden tour with Alison and Annette...

I'll let Peggy's words guide you through the garden. " We have lived here for 26 years, but didn't start creating the garden until 13 years ago.  Our long narrow piece of land slopes down to the water in a series of separate garden areas.  The upper area is mostly undeveloped but has a greenhouse,  a few fruit trees and a vegetable garden."

In the "mostly undeveloped" upper area, not far from the large greenhouse, we came across this pot ghetto.

Alison and I smiled at each other and I exclaimed, "She's one of us!"  

We all admired the red new growth on this filbert-looking small tree. 

There was a nice paved driveway but we chose to take this interesting path downward. 
And arrived at this lawn in front of the house. 

"You'll see a small lawn with Japanese forest grass and other shade lovers hugging its uphill side, and roses and other cottage-garden favorites filling the sunny bed opposite."

"On the right, a pond lends some movement and the sound of water.  

The way the stones were imbedded in the pavement and continued  down to line the pond was especially pleasing to my eye.


 "On the far side of the house, the garden continues its way down to the water with paths, decks and steps, terraces, and a rockery."  When Peggy and Bill's children were small, they asked what this ash door on the outside of the chimney was and they told them that it was a door for (the borrowers, tiny people, or garden fairies, I don't remember)  anyhow they made a small garden for the inhabitants and it remains even though the children are older now.

I admired these pebble mosaic pots!



Alison making another friend. 





So many paths to explore.

A grand staircase with berberis newel posts and hakonechloa cascading down one side.  

We wend our way closer to the water.  This was the lowest tide of the year but most of the time the water is much higher and has even done damage to the lower garden during winter storms.

"A seating area with a fire pit is tucked in just up from the bulkhead.  Planted with grasses and salt-tolerant rosa rugosa and cistus purpura, it makes a wonderful place to watch the waterfront activity and the sunsets."



"Be sure to walk out onto the dock pier to get a great overview of the rockery and terraces."

"Look for 'color vignettes' that have been tucked into different parts of the garden to punctuate or define certain areas.


 Treasures tucked between the cracks of the rocks as the steps lead onto the beach. 

Looking up another path.

Exquisite pot and plant combination!

Echoed here by more lavender.



"Our north-facing Puget Sound site, with its microclimates and slope, can be a challenge, but it's also a rewarding and very pleasant place to garden!"

I'll say!  The thought of moving those heavy pots, huge bags of compost, potting soil, etc. up and down the many steps had us all tired just thinking about it!  Peggy told us that at one point, one of the beds had been washed away and was rebuilt, requiring yards of soil to be brought in. Yikes!  The garden is breathtaking and certainly worth every sore muscle!   Thank you Peggy and Bill for opening your garden and being such nice hosts!

All too soon it was time to head on up that gorgeous staircase and be off to the next garden.  

28 comments:

  1. I agree that that is a stunning pot and plant combo (the purple). Looks like a fun adventure with all those paths leading everywhere. Great pond, too!

    ReplyDelete
  2. This garden definitely has the "PNW-look".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree, especially being on the bay like that!

      Delete
  3. That view back from the dock is lovely, and the pebble mosaic pots are wonderful. Do you know if the owners made them?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The pots came from Peninsula Gardens going out of business sale and were made in Mexico. It would be a great project though!

      Delete
  4. I love all these paths. Initially, the slope of the land may be challenging, but at the end it makes for a much more interesting garden. This is a really an appealing garden and the reward at the water's edge is well worth the walk down.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree, the various levels created so many different garden rooms, each one more interesting than the last.

      Delete
  5. Those last 13 years were busy ones. These folks have a way with stones and rocks that immediately endears them to me...and their way with plants is equally impressive.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was inspiring! They had help with the design and installation of the hardscape but the plant choices were all Peggy's. Her background in visual art really shows in her garden!

      Delete
  6. I agree with Emily - my 1st thought on viewing your photos was that this was the very definition of a PNW garden. I was sufficiently impressed by views of the upper levels but got gaga over the shots along the water. My views of the Port of LA aren't quite the same as a toes-in-the-water view. Thanks for another tour, Peter!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's my pleasure to see these gorgeous gardens and such a delight to share them!

      Delete
  7. OMG! this garden is absolutely fabulous. Love everything about it. So pristine! everything is beautiful, lush and cared for. I'd love to see this one in person. Lucky you and Alison. (Who I got to meet in person today! Horray! We had a great visit)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh wow! I'm glad you got to visit with Alison! I thought of you and the gorgeous rock work that you've shown in some of your previous posts when I saw this garden!

      Delete
  8. I can't grow japanese forest grass because it is all eaten up by rabbits, so I'm envious of theirs. I love the pond and the filbert foliage.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So you don't like growing bunny food?

      Delete
  9. Oh my, this is so fabulous .. I could settle in there quite happily !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They're nice folks and probably would love to have a delightful person like you move in with them.

      Delete
  10. I have been in this garden. It is wonderful, and your photos show it looking even better than before.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Oh, the pots - especially the mosaic pebble ones! Pots and PATHS - whose destinations are matched by the beauty along them! I also liked the color coordination (oranges) of flowers and carpet! Wow!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So much to love about this fabulous garden!

      Delete
  12. You do find some wonderful gardens to visit. Such a lovely spot with the river at the bottom of the garden, such beautiful plants and such a high standard of maintenance, altogether beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was incredible to see but it made me tired thinking of hauling bags of manure, etc. Down all those steps.

      Delete
  13. Wow, wow, wow. Perfection. What a beautiful labor of love. Every photo was exquisite, Peter. Even the one with Alison petting the resident kitty. You gotta love a cat person. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Grace. This garden was so well cared for it made me feel guilty about my own space.

      Delete
  14. This is one of my favorite gardens ever! Every step brings something interesting! Thank you Peter!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Trying to catch up on reading blog posts and commenting. I loved this garden and your photos and words really did it justice. Missing you and all the Flingers and hope you have a blast!

    ReplyDelete

Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.