-

-
Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Tricks and Treats for Halloween

My newfound friend and I wish you a happy Halloween!  We saw each other at Watson's Nursery and fell in love. Alas, our time together was not to last as there's only room for one b witch in any relationship.
She is spectacular, standing nearly 15 feet tall and with fabulous bat-like wings which make me wonder why she needs the broom.  Well she is, after all, a Watson's witch and that place is always squeaky  clean so maybe she has to pitch in with the housework.


She must have quite a sense of humor as these guys always seem to be laughing.

These glittery pumpkins are kind of cute! O.K. let's have a little chat: Lavender/purple has always been a  color present in the autumn garden with ornamental kale, mums, asters, colchicum and others all putting on their violet show and adding a light pastel foil to the screaming warm colors of fall foliage.  When, however, did this jewel-toned purple and chartreuse start creeping in on Halloween's traditional orange and black palette?
Don't get me wrong, I love color and have a "the more the merrier" attitude about it but was just wondering about the change.

The zombie garden gnome atop the pillar on the right caused me to laugh audibly.

These tree ghosts are always present in the garden but at this time of the year they look especially spooky.

And speaking of tree ghosts...  

Suppose you keep this year's Christmas tree, let all the needles fall off while storing it over the summer, spray paint the remains metallic silver or gold and use it again the following year?

So much for tricks, here are a few of the treats I saw.  This year is the first that Watson's has had Chief Joseph lodgepole pines.  This one is starting it's color shift from green to bright yellow for the winter. I no longer lust after this plant as my Sister and Niece gave me one in September.
Walking a little further and what to my wondering eye should appear but lots of  baby Chief Josephs.  See the cute little yellow tufts of needles?


The $40.00 price tag on these little ones is quite reasonable as one sometimes sees this size at specialty plant sales for fifty to eighty dollars.
This visit was full of reminders of my eldest sister; for instance, this other old bat I saw.

Speaking of the old bat, one of my students made this one.  I asked him what the cute little critters were and he said, "those are all the happy people."  Seems that everybody knows that the old bat brings happiness to those around her. 
Lest you think that I'm the meanest brother on the planet, 1) It is the job of the youngest sibling to be spoiled, irresponsible, and to irritate his family  2) We lovingly called my mother the old bat and upon her death, the niece and I declared, "the bat is dead, long live the bat."  The torch had been passed. 3) My sister's birthday is very near Halloween so she's a natural.

Meanwhile, back at Watson's,  the Acers were putting on holiday colors.




Coprosma 'Evening Glow' dressing up for winter.
Speaking of evening glow, this shot is from later the same evening.  I've never mooned anyone before but there's a first time for everything. 











Tricked ya! (Thank goodness!)  Happy Halloween everyone!


14 comments:

  1. Purple skulls, now that I like! Happy Halloween!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We were cutting out skeletons today and one of the kids, upon getting to the head, declared, "he's a bone head." Working with little ones keeps us laughing all day. Glad you liked the purple bone heads!

      Delete
  2. I came home Sunday to a pumpkin (non carved) on the front porch and two (very cool) vintage paper masks covering the sconces in the living room. The husband had been shopping! I am totally with you on the question of the purple and green glitter pumpkins. I guess I'm kind of a color purist...

    Happy Halloween!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What a great husband! Will you be putting plants in your pumpkins this year(Death defying black heuchera perhaps?) or just leaving them for the season? Throw some Indian corn on your door and you're good through Thanksgiving.

      Delete
  3. Dang! thanks for an amazing post. I love your pine!! And I love the black mondo grass and pumpkins! Epic!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'd never thought of black mondo and pumpkins, although I've had both, but it's a perfect combination! If you carve your pumpkin, the mondo would make fun hair!

      Delete
  4. Happy Halloween to you too! That's such a pretty picture of autumn leaves in your header. I don't know how that version of purple ended up being associated with the fall/Halloween, but they call a lot of purple foliage "black" in the plant world, maybe that's why.

    Hmm...I'm the youngest (spoiled brat) sibling in my family too. I wouldn't feel right calling my older sister an old bat, that's more suited to the middle one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alison, they do save the best for last! Nice to know another spoiled brat like myself.

      Delete
  5. The moon shot is glorious. Very clever of you to leave a large expanse to build suspense and have us feeling a little embare-assed for you as we scrolled down.

    Boo!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! It would have been really cool if I had a tripod but alas, only my shaky hands.

      EEK! You scared me!

      Delete
  6. Happy Halloween!!!! Great pics, great pics!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! Hope your Halloween isn't too scary!

      Delete
  7. Like your new header, your like me changing things. Great photo's and happy halloween to you. Sorry I haven't been visiting for a while, I was having a rest.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad you like the new header. It's fun to change things every now and then. Resting is good! I hope you feel rested and rejuvinated!

      Delete

Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.