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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Friday, October 26, 2012

Euonymus europaeus 'Red Ace'

While walking down my sidewalk, I noticed a flash of pink from the hellstrip.  It was Euonymus europaeus 'Red Ace' that came from Steamboat Island Nursery a few years ago when they still did retail sales.  If you don't know the nursery, do check out their website.  While they no longer do retail sales on site, they have a wonderful schedule of sales at which they vend, some of which have been new to me.  It's always fun to find a new plant sale, right?
 
I've posted before here about  the Euonymus europaens  inside the fence which is now fading but had a much more purple/red  seed show and, perhaps because it gets more sun, an earlier fruiting.
 
Euonymus europaens 'Red Ace' is a riot of color right now in my fading garden.  According to Plant Lust, this is available at Cistus Nursery in Portland but I also saw it last year at Vassey Nursery in Puyallup. 





My eye for color may not be the best, but I'd definitely call this a pink and orange combination rather than scarlet/orange.  Perhaps this, too is due to this plant being in the shade.  I'll be cutting down the shade-causing tree this winter so time will tell. 
In any case, I love this plant which somehow looks cheerful and spring-like in October! 
 
In keeping with Random Friday, here's an unrelated picture of part of my garden this month. I uploaded it to be part of an earlier post but somehow it got here.  Have a great weekend everyone!

27 comments:

  1. What an awesome pink and orange seedpod! I love it.

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  2. Amazing! But I have to admit, the last random foliage shot stole the show! For reals my heart fluttered at the sight.

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    1. Sorry about your atrial fibrillation! I'll try and tone down my foliage shots:-)

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  3. Hi, I love this variety of Euonymus. I grow the same plant, v.Euonymus fortunei. It's evergreen and very hardy. When the snow melts in Spring, its green leaves appear and I'm glad that the winter ended. Next to last photo is nice!
    Thank you for your comment on my post!

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    1. Hi Nadezdea! I just found your comment in the spam folder on blogger. Sorry! I didn't intentionally omit you!

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  4. Mine flowers but never produces those wonderful seedheads. Mayhaps it longs for a mate...but how to tell if the one I have is male or female?

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    1. It's always an uncomfortable question to have to ask. The only reason I know is because in one case I bought one labeled M and one labeled F and in the other case, there was one of each in the pot.

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  5. Mine now has shocking red/burgundy foliage as well as the beautiful seeds. I have about 4-5 on our property. They sucker a great deal and require pruning back each spring...or whenever! They can occasionally be found locally at Hort or church plant sales here in Ontario. Absolutely every visitor comments on them at this time of year when their branches hang low, heavy with fruit. I have one that does not bloom at all and remains green.

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    1. Interesting how plants behave differently in different situations. Mine have never sent up a single sucker perhaps because I've never pruned them. Now that they've achieved the height that I desier, the'll get a little trim from time to time.

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  6. It's a lovely plant with equally lovely habit and blooms, something to keep an eye on here. Lovely the garden photo too :)

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    1. Thanks. Glad that you like euonymous. It's a star in the late summer/ autumn garden but for the rest of the year, it's not the most thrilling plant in the world.

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  7. You know, the flowers remind me of Decentra spectabilis.

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  8. It looks so different there from our season here. We've got some snow and it's cold. No flowers!

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    1. We usually don't get snow until December. In some winters we may not get snow at all.

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  9. Those flowers are definitely pink and orange, love the last photo of your garden, framed by the tree branches, very artistic.

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  10. I have been tempted in the last two years to replace a tired and somewhat boring S.i 'Hakuro Nishiki' with one of the gorgeous 'spindles' - problem is I don't know which one I want..... I do love Euonymus sachalinensis but also love E.hamiltonianus 'Winter Glory' and 'Rising Sun.' Only problem is E.h isn't reliably winter hardy here whereas the Salix comes through year after year!

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    1. My 'Hakuro Nishiki' never looks as good as those at nurseries or in everyone else's garden but I think they're beautiful and they retain their color for the whole summer. The 'spindles' are fabulous in the fall but are pretty much boring blobs of green in the summer and sticks in the winter.

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  11. I love the wild and crazy color. It's funny-although I believe these are hardy for me I've never seen one for sale around here.

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    1. Probably many nurseries don't carry them because they look fairly boring until they produce seeds.

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  12. OMG! I absolutely LOVE that plant. those berries are fabulous

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    1. Groovy, right? Good luck with the coming storm!

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  13. Hi,

    Where in the US can I buy a young Euonymus Europaeus plant (shipping to Denver, CO)?

    I have one of these by my patio, and I just love it. It is very hardy, and it responds very well to pruning - over several years, I've been able to train/shape it into a little 'canopy' that provides shade to the patio sitting area.

    I've asked my local nurseries, but none of them can get it. I've looked online, but the nearest places that sell it are in the UK and Ireland :(

    Thanks

    P.S. I guess my last resort would be to try to propagate mine from semi-hardwood cuttings :)

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  14. Plantlust lists several mail order sources on the west coast that would ship to you http://plantlust.com/plants/euonymus-europaeus/ Also Forest Farm Nursery here https://www.forestfarm.com/search?q=Euonymus+Europaeus has a couple of varieties.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.