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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Monday, October 5, 2015

In A Vase On Monday

This fun vase, a three dollar thrift store find, intrigued me.  What would it be like to try and make an arrangement in something with such a wide flared lip?  Do you suppose that this was made to have one large, short stemmed flower in it or was it just meant to be a lovely object?  

Just as it was getting dark last night I ran out, secateurs, in hand to see what might be available to throw in the vase.  

The seed heads of Iris foetidissima were looking especially nice as is the evergreen foliage of Cupressus arizonica var. glabra (Arizona Blue Ice Cypress.)


Magenta Dahlias and a stem of Physalis alkekengi (Chinese Lantern Plant)

Magnolia macrophylla cones collected on Saturday while doing a little pruning in the parking strip.

A little spring of fuchsia.


A couple of grass blooms and some Phytolacca americana (Pokeweed) seeds all made it into the vase. Here's a tip:  If you're using a clear glass vase, it's probably not the best idea to wad up a piece of paper to help position stems. Do you see it there in the bottom?

Everything had to come out and be rearranged to gt the paper out.  Perhaps I'll start wiring things like the magnolia cones so that they can be placed in a wider variety of places in arrangements.  Still not totally happy with this but am too lazy to futz with it anymore.
In a vase on Monday is sponsored by Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.  Click here to see her Monday vase and links to those of other participants 'round the world. Happy new week all!

30 comments:

  1. Not the easiest of vases to make an arrangement but you've done it well with flair!

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    1. Thanks. It was thrown together fairly quickly.

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  2. Gorgeous! Love the color and texture combination. Well done!

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  3. Wow Peter, that's scrumptious! You've pulled of a very lush and colorful arrangement with everything complimenting the whole.

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  4. What an intriguing selection you have used - those magnolia 'cones' are amazing and you have trimmed them so artistically. Everything works so well together - thanks for sharing Peter

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  5. I never would have had the imagination to pick those items thinking that they would go together in any way!!! Well done, an absolutely gorgeous eye catcher. Would you like to fill some of my vases for me?

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    1. This is what happens when one goes out to pick flowers after dark!

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  6. That is a very creative arrangement of flowers and seedpods. You know that combination of orange and pink is my current favorite. I wonder if this vase is one that you could just use to float a flower or two in water?

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    1. It might look sweet with floating pansies, hellebores, etc.

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  7. And very effective it is too. I love the colour scheme. Aren' t those Magnolia seed heads amazing?

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    1. Thank you, Chloris. Magnolia seed heads are, indeed, amazing!

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  8. I was wondering how those colors were going to come together, Peter, but you made them shine as an arrangement! I scatter my Magnolia cones to dissuade the raccoons and skunks from digging in my garden beds but now I'll have to give serious consideration to using them in a vase. My cones seldom have many seeds, though - the squirrels remove those as soon as the cones fall.

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    1. There are quite a few nut trees in the hood so maybe our squirrels are more concerned with those. They seldom touch the magnolia seeds.

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  9. I love orange and magenta together!

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  10. I love the idea of using seedheads in arrangements. Well done!

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    1. Thanks, I have a lot of seedy things around right now.

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  11. The blue cypress and beautiful red magnolia seeds look so festive on your black background, Peter, and really dress up the flamboyant pink Dahlias, along with the Chinese lanterns and dangling shiny Poke berries.

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  12. I thought Phytolacca seeds are black, Peter. Yours are red, very pretty.

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    1. They eventually get black but go through several color stages before they get there. Thank you, Nadezda.

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  13. What an interesting, eye-catching arrangement! I have to admit, I wondered how the orange and red and magenta would all look together, but it really works! Nice job!

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    1. The colors all looked similar in the dark when I cut them. Thank you Kimberly.

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  14. Hard to improve on that fabulous, dramatic last shot, no matter how much fiddling you might do. The challenge of an unusual vase shape can lead to inspired arrangements, as it has here.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.