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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day July 2015

July is going way too fast for me.  Can you believe that it's the 15th, Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day, again already?  On the 15th of each month, Carol at May Dreams Gardens hosts GBBD.  Thanks Carol!  Be sure to visit her blog to see blooms from around the world!

Here are some of the blooms catching my eye in my garden:

Brugmansia 'Snowbank' has leaves edged in white and sweet blooms that emerge white, slowly aging to light peach.
Smells divine at night.

As does Brugmansia 'Charles Grimaldi'

This is the month of the lilies!  Some seem  a little early to me. I'm blaming the heat. The cool thing about GBBD is that I can go back and see what was blooming in my garden at this time in years past. 










Hydrangea 'Pistachio'

Hydrangea 'Harlequin' which was turned pink by the grower.  I prefer blue but haven't gotten around to changing it back in the years she's been in my garden.  Maybe next year...


Tuberous begonia.

Trachelospermum jasminoides AKA Confederate Jasmine. Will not be taking this down.

'Fragrant Cloud'

'Calypso'

Rosa Glauca
Fuchsias




Dichroa febrifuga

Alstroemeria 'Sweet Laura'

Abutilon 

Clerodendrum trichotomum has become a humming bird battle ground.

Alstroemeria aurea

Begonia boliviensis 

Salpiglosis

Hydrangea quercifolia which, in our recent heat has produced a lovely fragrance that I'd never smelled before.

Those silly pansies, planted out in October to bloom through the winter but didn't have been blooming since spring.  Crazy things.

Weedy wild sweet peas 


Buddleia with a weeping and non invasive habit. 


 Leycesteria formosa

Albizia julibrissin or Mimosa.  Here, they're not invasive.

Gardenia by the back door.  Ah, the fragrance!

Crazy neon geranium (pelargonium) that's been blooming all year.

Hosta 'Sum and Substance'


Not technically a flower, here's some smoke from the smoke tree. 


Bunch of stuff.

Crocosmia 'Hell Fire'


Calycanthus 'Hartlage Wine' keeps throwing out blooms.  Hope it doesn't think it's dying!

Happy GBBD all!




44 comments:

  1. You've got some great stuff here Peter! I like the "Bunch of Stuff" description. :) Love the Leycesteria formosa too!

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    1. Bunch of stuff is botanical latin for too lazy to list the individuals.

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  2. All so pretty! But I am especially jealous of your Hydrangeas. I need more Alstroemeria. And you have way more flowers on your Brugs than I have on mine. I have lots of leaves. I'm starting to wonder if it was the makeup of the fertilizer I gave them.

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    1. Hydrangeas grow well for me in the shade. Alstoemerias are wonderful. I'll try to remember to save seed for you. This is the first time that 'Snowbank' has ever been like that. Usually it's got lots of beautiful leaves and fewer flowers. Effect of my spider mite problem?

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  3. So many flowers! I remember seeing Hydrangea 'Pistachio' in nurseries with muted greenish color, never with such vibrant pink. Is their color also changeable by the soil composition? The neon pink pelargonium has been a staple in your GBBD posts for months: there should be an award for such performance; it's quite remarkable.

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    1. My 'Pistachio' is growing in a pot and starts out this vibrant pink color and changes as it ages to the muted greenish color. The pelargonium is looking a bit leggy and I should take cuttings to root.

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  4. that's a great point, how you can go back and see what was blooming last year. and, your shots aren't too terrible either. nice.

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    1. Bloom day is a nice way of keeping a garden journal without too much work. Thanks for the kind words.

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  5. Great selection but your brugmansias are particularly putting out a fabulous show!

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  6. Love it all. Lilies, Daylilies and Hydrangeas are so last month here. They have to get a little rest and then do it all over again. Yours are fantastic. Love those Violas, too.

    Confederate Jasmine has nothing to do with the Deep South except that it grows well here. Like many of our favorites plants in the southeast, it comes from China and is named for the Confederate States of Jinjoseon, Majoseon and Beonjoseon. I guess our garden vine/groundcovers are safe unless the singular word is banned.

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    1. You get two bloom cycles from your hydrangeas? How lucky is that? Didn't know that about Confederate Jasmine. Good to know.

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  7. Oh those Brugmansia!!! Simply gorgeous.

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  8. It doesn't seem that the heat has hurt your garden at all, Peter. All those lilies! And Hydrangeas, Fuchsias and Begonias too!

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  9. Pretty pictures! But this post really made me want to include more scented plants in my garden...

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    1. Oh yes! I love fragrant plants as their presence adds another sensual dimension to the garden.

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  10. Your gardens look amazing Peter, I added a couple things to my want list after seeing your photos.It's also good to know that the Mimosa tree is not invasive here,I want a chocolate one they are so beautiful. Thanks for giving us a look into your gardens. Glenda

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    1. Thanks, Glenda, it's always a pleasure to share. In previous years, I've seen the chocolate Mimosas at the box stores for really low prices.

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  11. Your garden seems like it must be in peak bloom, everything is doing great! The Brugsmansias are looking wonderful, I particularly like the variegated leaves. The fragrance must be wonderful!

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    1. The fragrance of brugmansias is what lured me into liking them.

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  12. I think you're right about the Lillies , mine are done and gone …too quick !

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    1. That is too quick! We've been a bit cooler than you as usual but I still think of oriental lily time as being late July through August.

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  13. Perfect place for a Mimosa, somewhere it doesn't reseed--awesome. The tuberous begonia, what I can only dream of growing here in the land of dry.

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    1. I'd trade begonias for for the ability to grow (in the ground) your beautiful winter-blooming aloes!

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  14. I would love to follow my nose around your garden. If my Brugs ever decide to put out flowers, I must remember to sniff them up.

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    1. You and your nose are always welcome in my garden!

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  15. Beautiful!! I love it all! Are those the begonias you ordered from England?

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    1. Thanks. Nope, those were on sale at a nursery and I couldn't resist.

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  16. Lots of great blooms, Peter! I'm looking forward to trying some lilies now that the deer can't eat them. I love your fuchsias. That's one plant I'm willing to put in the garden even if it does need water. And another plant I can grow now.

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    1. Hooray for the deer fence! You'll have that area full of plants in no time!

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  17. Ooh, you're a Rosa glauca man! And I don't think I've seen Crocosmia 'Hell Fire' before. Nice mix of color on that one.

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    1. Crocosmia 'Hellfire' came from Far Reaches Farm. Here's Kelly's Description: "You don't have to sell your soul to have this in your garden but once you see it, you would be more than willing. New selection from the UK that has to be Lucifer's love child. This is so much better than that old devil. Stout dark sooty stems holding deep burning red flowers with a wide flared corolla that lacks only the smell of brimstone and the wail of sinners. We do get involuntary high-pitched keening from people who see our big display plant so maybe we're just missing the brimstone."

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  18. Between you and Scott, all these gorgeous lilies!! I think I need to get some next year. Happy GBBD!

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  19. Your brugmansia and lillies are gorgeous Peter. And I looove the smoke tree "smoke".

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  20. Where to begin?? Love the Brugmansia; I've never grown it before, but you are certainly tempting me to re-think that if I can find a place for it. My lilies seem early, too, but they're all a welcome sight whenever they appear. I laughed at your pink hydrangea. I bought some blue 'Endless Summer' hydrangeas many years ago, and of course they turned pink the next year. I've tried in vain to get them to turn blue again, but the best I can do is lavender. Maybe I'll have to move them to the PNW:)

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  21. Wonderful! I agree about the lilies - mine are practically come and gone. :( So, practical question - how does one get a Brugmansia to bloom? I rescued two last year, but neither has even as much as a bud yet. I water quite a bit. Maybe I should I fertilize?

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  22. My head is spinning!!!! I was going to pick a favorite, but quickly despaired!

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  23. The Smoke Tree was lovely. Great shot of the Salpiglosis.

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  24. Amazing Brugmansias and Lilies!

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.