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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Friday, October 24, 2014

Random Friday

I headed out to the garden yesterday after work during a few moments when the rain was not torrential  to choose a favorite plant for this week but took a bunch of random shots instead.

A NOID Acer palmatum starting to show some orange color.  I don't think it's had the same fall color two years in a row; one year red, another yellow, and now orange.




Some gardener planted this cute little four inch pot of Echium pininata  a bit too close to the path earlier this year.  As they are wont to do, this one has decided to lay on it's side.  Unfortunately, it chose to lay down toward the front of the bed.  Oh well, if it makes it through the winter, I'll let it stay and bloom. Who really wanted to go down that path anyway?

The dinosaur, still emerging from his egg, doesn't seem to mind the rain.

However, I do so I ducked into the greenhouse to get out of the downpour that started.  It's getting fairly full in there.



This brugsmansia  is so tall that it's reaching through the rafters.  I debated leaving it outside this year but thought that perhaps it might like to be a permanent resident inside
 It's supposed to rain again all day on Saturday so we'll play around with moving things around to perhaps make more space.  We'll see what happens.

 I like these terra cotta chimney liners and have a few more out in the garden that could come in and be used to make more bench space.  Just to the left of the  Kalanchoe luciae (big paddle plant on the right) is Salvia clevelandii (Alpine form) perfuming the air.  


I'm looking forward to rearranging things as it would be nice to put a table and chairs in the middle of the green goodness rather than at one end of it.


I've got to say that it was pretty wonderful to duck in here and enjoy a bit of garden that wasn't soggy!

Only a few more plants to bring in and the migration will be complete!  


A little potting and then the bench got cleaned up a bit but by then, the camera was back inside so here it is mess and all!  Still so much to do but at least the plants are inside and safe for the winter!
Happy weekend everyone!

35 comments:

  1. Such an amazing space! I'm just imagining how comforting it will be to hang out in there during the winter--surrounded by lushness and listening to the rain on the roof.

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    1. We're already quite used to the sound of the rain on the roof! It's a fun space!

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  2. A table and chairs in there would make the space just perfect, and such a welcome spot to sit and have coffee in the winter. My, my, you do have a lot of tender plants! Where did you get the chimney liners? I've looked for them at Lowes and Home Depot but can't find them.

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    1. I have a couple of different tables I'm thinking of using, maybe both if we can reconfigure the space well enough. It does look like a lot when they're all in one space like that and not spread out over four different rooms in the house. Much easier and faster migration this year! I got the chimney liners at Jones glass and used materials years ago but I'm told that masonry places would have them.

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  3. So beautiful and I bet it smells glorious.

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    1. I was just noticing that it smelled much fresher in there than it did when it was a garage!

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  4. So wonderful, but... no hanging baskets? So many to hang, and not one in sight. :)

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    1. There are a couple on the far wall but I don't have a lot of hanging plants.

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  5. Wow, when did you get so many plants?

    Love that last photo, the view out to the bamboo and a view of you in the mirror.

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    1. Most of the plants have been around for quite a few years. They get stuffed into various beds for the summer and blend into the jungle.

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  6. Your greenhouse looks great - you definitely need a table and chairs in there! As for the "torrential rain" - sigh...

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    1. Thanks, Kris. I wish I could send a little of this wet stuff your way in exchange for some of your sunshine!

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  7. Those chimney liners are way handsome. Are they generally available or a 'find'?
    My Gram used to rearrange all her furniture regularly. One night my uncle came home very late and threw himself on the bed...but it wasn't there. He was laughing to hard to get angry. I pretty much find the best place for things and leave them there, except for the biennial migration when I feel like a window decorator.

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    1. I found these at a used materials yard years ago and they've been put to many uses! I understand that some masonry supply places might have them for sale. Funny story about your uncle!

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  8. That is an impressive collection... and I agree, those terracotta chimney liners make very nice plant benches!

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  9. Nice glimpse of your garage Peter! The space looks fun to spend time in during the winter (and all the other seasons actually).

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    1. Once it gets tidied up a bit, it will be lots of fun!

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  10. Flue liners make great table supports, don't they?

    The Victorian in me wants to put temporary skirts on your folding tables.

    Brugmansias left outside are apt to be toast in a container. Mine in the ground die back and are forever getting back to the stage where they bifurcate and start having buds. Inside is best if you have the room. It may lose its leaves but then it will green up again, not to worry.

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    1. Those flue liners were a great find years ago! I think I paid something like a couple of dollars each because they were used.

      Funny you should mention that as I was just thinking that I should put skirts on them just like my pal Jean did in her greenhouse.

      Brugmansias left outside here die to the ground even in a mild winter. Because our springs are usually on the cool side, it takes them forever to re emerge in the spring and when/if they do, the slugs usually eat everything as it comes up. They are definitely best inside in my neck of the woods!

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  11. The sheer volume of plants you have! I love the little pots on the beams along the windows. When you eventually finish arranging everything you may like it so much maybe some of the plants could stay in their new location permanently! It already looks very inviting and cozy. A sitting area and a cup of something hot will be perfect to combat winter blues. And contemplation of future gardening adventures.

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    1. There are a few plants that may become permanent residents inside! It would look too empty if everything moved out for the summer. I know I'll be spending a lot of time out there on winter weekends!

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  12. Great update! It is fun to see you pulling it all together and then enjoying your new space. I like the idea of a table and chairs in the middle. In UK they really enjoy their glass greenhouse extensions on their houses in the winter.

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    1. Our climate here is similar to that of parts of the U.K. complete with lots of rain and cloudy winter days. It'll be fun to spend time out there this winter!

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  13. So much lovely, colourful foliage. I bet you are enjoying your greenhouse too. Have a great weekend.

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    1. Thank you. Yes, I am enjoying my greenhouse very much.

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  14. Your plants are so lucky to have such a place to overwinter, Peter! My garage can host only several pots...
    It's nice to see a maple changing its colors. I still wait for my Japanese maples to change. So far, only one of them did. Others are still green. I noticed the same at Lakewold Gardens. Not much fall color so far, and a big difference with my last year's pictures.
    Have a great (wet) weekend!

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    1. It is nice to have one place for them all instead of several rooms on different floors of our house. This autumn is very different from the last few we had. Not some trees are loosing leaves but most of the maples are barely starting to change color. Maybe it was the dry summer?

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  15. The new greenhouse turned out nice. You do have way more plants to store than I thought. Those agaves should be happier in there since they don't like being soggy and cold. Not fun to keep agaves in the house either, yikes!

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    1. It wasn't so bad storing the agaves inside as they were in a room that we seldom enter but it was sure nice not to have to carry the big plants up a few flights of stairs! I was surprised by how many plants came inside! I brought in some things that usually would be left outside, like coleus and geraniums.

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  16. I trust you had a fine productive weekend in the greenhouse, moving things around and finding new ways to use old things.

    There are many great ideas on your posts, photos you may have made without contemplating that a scene from the Garden Show or a display in a Garden Center might work in a future greenhouse.

    Not the least of these is the screen of 3 doors on your 'After the Plant Exchange' post, also featured back in the spring at the Garden Show. I kept eyeing that blue door and wondering if you see it with 2 complementary companions making a place for yard tools and equipment to hide behind? I hoped so.

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    1. Worked all day Saturday moving furniture from the little glass room where part of the hoard used to winter and pulling tables from various places, hanging mirrors, etc. Didn't re-arrange the big tables as they are covered in plants. Next year, I can be more deliberate

      You are so right, now that the plants are safely inside I can play with arranging them. You also pegged the three door screen idea. This door was previously the garage door so it was already there. There is another door in the basement waiting to come up and another on the back porch. I'm thinking of two blues and a yellow or maybe blue yellow and white or pink.

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  17. What fun, you will be able to spend all winter re- arranging the plants in the greenhouse. You have some lovely treasures in there.
    My Echium pininata is sprawling around just like yours is. I would love to see it flowering but I don't suppose it will survive the winter.

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    1. In mild winters Echium pinninata will survive to grow even larger and bloom gloriously. Cross fingers!

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  18. You are going to love spending time in there this winter. Mine is not quite that large, but it's still cozy when I go out there to piddle. The cats love it, too.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.