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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Danger Gardenette Migration

You may recall a post about clearing out a new space for my collection of  spiky plants which I've affectionately named the danger gardenette after the blog of the agave evangelist who made me appreciate these plants even more.  Here we are on a very rainy day placing a few pots and plants to see where things might best fit.  Notice the fun metal agave that came from Dragonfly Farms.  I'm not sure that it's the best placement for it or any of the other plants but I'll keep playing.


Here are some plants that have just come out of their winter prison and in some cases have gotten their first watering since they were dragged inside.  These will stay in this area that only gets brief morning sun for a few days before traveling down to a the brighter area.

And some more.

And still more.  

Some already hardened off candidates pose for possible placement.  (Yes, the plastic pots will be gone when it's done and the conifer does not belong with this group;  it's also been moving around trying to find an appropriate place to live. 
Believe it or not, there are a few agaves not pictured that need to fit in here.  I could wrap the pots around the corner or maybe put some of the hardier plants in the ground.  Should be fun to see what happens!  Suggestions?

30 comments:

  1. I think it's a good idea this "dangerette garden" style , you need a warning sign .

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    1. Oh, people will know once they've tried to cuddle up to an agave.

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  2. I need to get another good look at your garden again. I've really only seen it once, early in the year, and briefly. Looks like you've taken a few Echevarias outside already?

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    1. I keep forgetting that you haven't seen my garden more frequently. You are welcome to come and see my shame any time. I'm about three months behind you Mrs. Busy Bee!

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  3. What an impressive collection! I'm all for putting plants in the ground, but it may prove to be the real danger (to them that is). Its fun moving them around like a puzzle, until you find the sweet spot where they fit best, and then move them again when you need to. I covet the table and chairs in the small sitting area.

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    1. I may try some of the hardier ones in the ground. Some spent the winter up on a covered porch protected only from the rain and did fine. If I can figure out to keep the rain off of them while in the ground, they should be o.k! The table and chairs came from one of the box stores at an end of the season 50% off sale after someone chopped down a tree and it fell on our old green plastic table. To my credit, it didn't hit a single plant!

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  4. Oh my, you've got it bad my friend! (so many fabulous plants though). I think you should try a couple in the ground, you never know...they just might make it and look fabulous (plus free up valuable space too).

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    1. Perhaps there are simply too many plants. The little ones squeeze in well between the larger ones so we'll see. I'm thinking that some plants might need to go to the Agave resce.

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  5. The danger gardenette is growing quickly. That's quite a collection and they look good for having spent the winter indoors. Moving those dangerous plants around in pots is quite challenging but I might try my new A. medio-picta in a pot for a year or so before planting it out.

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    1. Some day, when I have a greenhouse down in the garden area, hauling the plants a few feet will be very easy compared to hauling them all to the top floor of the house each fall. They are such lovely plants though...If only I lived in zone 9!

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  6. Danger is right! I'm thinking of that song by Usher, "You've got it bad." I love your collection! I'm sure it will look killer when it's all put together!

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    1. I'm kind of stalling on putting it together by doing lots of other garden jobs. There are lots of plants to play with though. It's time for many of them to be repotted and potting agaves is never fun.

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  7. If I had that many spiky plants, I'd be covered in band aids! Have you thought of building a terraced area that would allow you to create a permanent home for them? Something kind of boulder-ish would be cool.

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    1. I have some some materials to make a terraced sort of thing for some of them but because there's enough differences in the sizes, the pots themselves can act as risers of sorts. Some of the small ones fit nicely on stilts between some of the larger ones. Some of these might be hardy here in the ground but probably not in pots so the risers could be permanent but the plants would still need to travel twice a year. In a couple of years, when we get around to turning the garage into a greenhouse, many of the plants prefer hot and arid conditions may become permanent greenhouse residents.

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  8. All your spiky plants look great after staying indoors all winter, I enjoy looking at yours. I have no confidence I could ever keep them alive myself. I guess one of those roofed pavilions could keep rain off plants, and look great. One with the barbeque grills and outdoor seating and video screens would be nice...

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    1. I like the way you think! I've been surprised at how easy agaves are to keep in the house over the winter. They came in wet from autumn rains so didn't get watered for a long time, some only once all winter.

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  9. Your house must be feeling sort of empty and spacious now. Have fun playing with your spiky friends.

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    1. The plants were stored in rooms upstairs that we seldom see so the house doesn't feel too different. However, when the begonias that are taking up all the counter space in the kitchen are gone, it'll be magical!

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  10. I hate spiky plants, but I still grow Roses and always get thorned. You have a great collection of spikie's there, I hope you find a spot for the lovely conifer. Best Wishes.

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    1. I used to dislike them and still am not so fond of opuntias that have glochids that look and feel soft but will go through most gloves and stick in your skin and irritate it until you remove them with tweezers. I love foliage that grows across paths and brushes you gently as you walk by. However the sculptural beauty of these has won me over.

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  11. Ah, I can hear the plants sighing with pleasure to be moved outside again. I'm slowly moving some of my tougher indoor plants outside. So many of mine are truly tropical though that I'll have to wait until the nights are a little warmer.

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    1. My truly tropicals usually don't make it outside. These are mostly hardy plants that just can't take our wet winters although there are some zone niners in there too.

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  12. I do the same way Peter. You are right some plants need to used to new conditions. I see you have many succulents and one conifer ---on the last photo. Is that tuja?

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    1. The conifer in the last picture is Chamaecyparis obtusa 'tetragona aurea.' It was so beautiful in the winter.

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  13. You have quite a collection of lovely, spiky plants. Welcome to the dark side!

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    1. When I saw how happily they grown in California, I felt guilty for keeping them captive and had the urge to take them all down there to set them free!

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  14. What a huge collection you have, you have got the bug really badly! We just have one Agave, a variegated one which is outside all year round. Planted in the scree bed which has soil that I have made very gritty, it seems happy and flowers when we have a hot summer, which isn't very often! Weeding round it is a problem, those spikes are so sharp, I usually cut them off before getting close and personal!

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    1. It may be time to thin my collection a bit.

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  15. I love this idea!!! it is going to look fabulous!
    Is that some kind of "cloth" made of pebble on top of the table where you have so many spiky plantas?? I like it a lot!

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    1. It's a nylon mesh with pebbles glued to it. These are made for mosaic applications, flooring, etc, as an alternative to tile. The idea is that you spread mastic on the surface, lay the mat(s) of pebbles on the floor, wall, etc. let it dry and then apply grout. It's much easier than applying one pebble at a time. I found this long piece of it at Valley Nursery a few years ago and have used it as a table runner.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.