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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

The Garden of Phoebe Fine

 I'm going to allow Ms Fine's own words to guide you through her garden.
 "On a typical city lot (50' x 100') our small garden features herbs and vegetables, ornamental trees and shrubs and a haven for urban wildlife.


"We moved in to our home 23 years ago and inherited a lot that had a few roses, a couple of rhododendrons and a quintessential lawn."

"With a degree in landscape architecture and a passion for plant collecting, we quickly developed the structure of the garden with heritage treee on the north side and a perennial border/ cutting garden on the south side."

"Small water features attract daily visits of hummingbirds, chickadees and robins, and a compost pile allows us to build healthy soil year after year.



"Our sanctuary garden is a well-tended and densely planted combination of colorful flowers, outdoor rooms and interesting foliage throughout the year."

Every clothesline support should have a chandelier!



 A nice grouping of plants in terra cotta pots.


Cool architectural fragments!

We pacific north westerners do enjoy glass in our gardens!



Eclectic art choices punctuate the garden.



Gurgling water, densely planted beds  and violets between the steps.  This place breathes relaxation and peacefulness.

Thanks for allowing us to tour your lovely garden Ms Fine!  

34 comments:

  1. I hesitate to say it, but I had almost forgotten this garden. It was lovely and peaceful, but others we saw that day kind of overshadowed it.

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    1. We packed so many fun visits into that one six hour period that it's amazing we can remember anything. Just one more reason to love having some photos to refer back to.

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  2. It feels like a sanctuary indeed with its aura of serenity!

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  3. I think you're aware of how much I admire "eclectic art pieces".... This is certainly a delightful, peaceful property. (And some of us N.E Indiana folk like our glass in the garden, too!)

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    1. Oh yes, we're on the same page there! Glass in the garden seems to have increased in popularity quite a bit in the last sevaral years.

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  4. Have you managed to work in any time in your own garden with all this touring you've been up to?

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    1. Usually have an hour or two after work on weekdays. Had two full days in my own garden this weekend and it felt great! There are still a lot of jobs to do but in 13 more school days (not that I'm counting) I'll have a lot of time to devote to the garden. This is why my place usually looks its best from 9:00 to 9:15 p.m. on August 25. Of course then it falls apart again.

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  5. I have a weakness for red brick tudor homes and I'm a little envious of those who live in them. One doesn't see clothes lines very often, (particularly in Seattle), it's a relic of days past. The chicken wire at the bottom of the pole puzzled me...

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    1. I'm also a fan of brick tudors! I didn't see anything growing at the base of the chicken wire so it must be there to protect rabbits from hurting their teeth trying to eat the "bark" off of the clothesline base. I'm guessing that they're thinking of either growing something up that pole or are using the chicken wire as an armerature on which to put concrete to create something interesting. Faux bois tree perhaps?

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  6. The chicken wire had me wondering too. We use it to deter deer, but what would a deer want with a clothesline pole? Perhaps vines will someday grow up it?

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    1. Deer might chip their teeth on the clothesline and they're such brats about having dental work done. Who would be liable for that sort of thing? Maybe they'll plant a vine later or they have and it's slow to emerge. Good question!

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  7. It's clearly a garden loved by the gardener. And Ms. Fine has a sense of humor adding that chandelier!

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  8. This is a delightful sanctuary with unexpected gems turning up in every nook.

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    1. It's always a pleasure to have you along!

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  10. Hehe, I like the pensive gargoyle. I can relate to him.

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    1. He seems like an amiable enough fellow.

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  11. I love it all, but perhaps most of all the sweet little pond that attracts birds every day. Thanks Ms Fine, and to you, OG, for the post.

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    1. It was a pleasure to see the garden, to share it, and especially to have you along on the tour!

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  12. Again another beautiful garden. You guys never rest on creating awesome places. What a wonderful place to live and garden.

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    1. We're extremely lucky to live in this paradise for gardeners!

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  13. It is really interesting, I hope everybody lick this Post.

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  14. Love this garden, Peter! Love water features as pond and fountain, also sad devil is so pretty!

    P.S. I've sent you e-mail.

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    1. I'm glad you enjoyed this garden, Nadezda.

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  15. Such a lovely peaceful garden and so well planted, no room at all for any weeds! Maybe one day mine will be like that!

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    1. Oh Pauline, I think your garden is very well planted and peaceful!

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  16. What an interesting garden. I would love to se it in person.

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    1. It was interesting! I think it's open by appointment so you could go any time!

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.