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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Monday, January 6, 2014

Something Old, Something New, Somethig Borrowed, Somthing Blue.

Did you think there might be wedding plans afoot?  Not so much, but on December 31st, we were kicking around the house and decided to pay a winter visit to Dig Nursery on Vashon Island.  The nurseries that push the plants aside to celebrate the carnival of the holidays are exciting but I'm especially fond of the places that keep the plants as the stars of the show during this darkest season.  Dig is one of those.  What better way to celebrate the passing of the year than to visit a place that continues to inspire gardeners each year with fresh ideas, fabulous plants, and unusual garden furniture, some of which is created on site by Ross and Sylvia, the dynamic duo behind Dig!  During our visit, several projects were underway including the removal of everything from the building that houses garden implements, interior accents, and house plants to prepare for renovation.  An exciting time to celebrate the old and welcome the new.

Something(s) old.
 
 
Looking wonderful in all seasons, this pot with a single grass shines in the gray northwest mist.


Sylvia's planted spheres looking festive.

Colletia hystrix, just finished blooming, seems to be taking  winter in stride.

Calluna vulgaris 'Firefly' screams to be noticed with its neon orange color.

Hebe ochracea 'James Stirling' is winning my heart as a great plant for year round interest!

 Arctostaphylos densiflora 'Howard McMinn'
 looks great with this bonsai-esque treatment.

Sarracenias still looking gorgeous.

My Melianthus looks just like this after the freeze.   They'll certainly come back from the roots but some of the stems still look happy lower down.  Here's hoping for mild temps!

Because my steel trap of a memory is coated in Teflon, I don't remember the name of this but isn't it sweet!

Phormium looking great and what's that to the left?
 Acacia dealbata has  only a few leaves that seem touched by the freeze and look, it's heavily budded!

Sylvia reports that this tree has, in past freezes, died to the ground but come back from the roots. Clearly not this year! Looks like in a week or so there'll be sweet yellow pom-pom blooms to enjoy.  Hooray!

 Prunus lusitanica 'Variegata'  looking quite handsome. 

Vaccinium glauco-album - good looks and yummy huckleberries - who could ask for anything more.

Mahonias were hummingbird central!

Euphorbia putting on it's winter/new growth blush.

Sedum palmeri

Sedum (spathulifolium?)

Rose hips



 
 
Something(s) New:
 
Sylvia and Ross are doing a major renovation on the garden around the house at the front of the nursery.   Take a gander at this gabion frame.  There will be several of these "arcs de triomphe" in the new garden design. 

Think of the possibilities for hanging plants, artwork, etc. on these. 

Or growing vines up and through them.  Of course, pruning in the middle could be a little difficult.

With the new year comes Helleborus foetidus pushing up their tough bloom spikes.



Something(s) borrowed.  O.K. I bought them, borrowing from a nursery is poor form and isn't looked upon favorably.  Anyway, here's what came home with me.

Giving Trachelospermum asiticum 'Ogon Nishiki one more chance.  I had a very small  one several years ago which sat and did very little so I gave it away.   Sylvia says that the secret to success with this one is full sun and sharp drainage. 
 
 Daphne odora 'Maejima'   You can't have too many good scents in the garden in winter, right?

Arctostaphylos densiflora 'Howard McMinn'

Arctostaphylos 'John Dourley' - oh that smooth bark...sigh.
 
 
Something(s)  Blue - well turquoise, but work with me here.
 
 
You're probably familiar with the rusty metal arbors, trellises, etc. carried by nurseries across the country.   Dig is the only nursery in our area who has them powder coated in brilliant colors. 
 
Look Alison, turquoise and orange just for you!
 
Aluminum hanging pots in far out colors.   

 Hope you enjoyed our little winter visit to Dig and that it inspires you to go plant shopping!


41 comments:

  1. When I read the header I thought you're getting married... Happy Monday, Peter!

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  2. I REALLY like those colored powder-coated items. Our current landscape here is basically black and white so a visit to your post here was a great escape!

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    1. We're pretty lucky to live here. Gardeners and hummingbirds seem to be drawn to bright colors.

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  3. Oh, those orange pots! Be still, my heart. And all that powder coated metal. So fantastic! Your new Arctostaphylos look a lot like the ones I bought down at Xera last fall, are they Xera plants? Those gabions are pretty cool.

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    1. We may need to visit Vashon again! The Arctostaphylos (Arctostaphyloi? Arctostahpyloses?) are Xera plants!

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  4. Wonderful plants, wonderful color and that turquoise is great.

    Most of the plants seem to be taking the weather is stride. It's been so cold that I find myself searching for signs of budding acacias or just about anything to show spring will be arriving. We'll be warming up this week.

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    1. I'm happy for you that you'll be warming up! Spring will come! I've seen a few signs!

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  5. Great tour! Did Sylvia say how cold it got there during the freeze? Looks to have been a lot warmer than here. Nice purchases you made, and I'm hoping someone local will start carrying those metal hanging containers!

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    1. We didn't get as cold here as you got and Vashon, surrounded by water, is sometimes a little more protected than Tacoma. I'm thinking that buying Weber barbecue tops at junk stores and spray painting them might give a similar effect.

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  6. Thanks for letting us tag along on your tour. It's too cold here to get out and tour except for virtual tours. I did cover my cabbages against the coming hard freeze.

    Turquiose and lime are in my spring plans. Those hanging planters look terrific.

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    1. Turquoise and lime are such a great combination! Sorry about your hard freeze but I'll bet your cabbages will sail through!

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  7. James Stirling is my favorite Hebe. The first one I planted is some 3' across now and producing volunteers! It's copper tone is very beautiful in winter.
    Thanks for the tour: I never been to Dig, but now my curiosity is peaked and I think I will take the Vashon ferry and see for myself.

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    1. Dig is a great nursery. Spring through fall are amazing but even in winter they have great plants!

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  8. Those gabion arches are a great idea and looking forward to seeing what they do with them. And we want some of those bright coloured aluminium baskets!!

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    1. I can see them hanging from the edges of the structure over your new koi pond!

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  9. The vacinium glaucum album spreads by stolens like salal, but not as agressively.
    Deirdre

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    1. You will find it coming up in plants a foot or two away from where it's planted.

      Deirdre

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    2. Maybe it's best that I didn't buy it.

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  10. What a great nursery to visit in winter! I love the planted spheres with the bunchberry heathers - they're a wonderful look. And I'm going to arm-wrestle Alison for the orange and turquoise pots!

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    1. Alison's back might not be totally healed so I'll bet you can take her!

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  11. Love the arcs de triomphe! You have to remember to go back in summer and post pictures of them covered in flowering vines.

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    1. I'll definitely go back to visit but don't know if they'll plant anything to grow up the arches as Sylvia and Ross really love clean lines.

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  12. Many of our standby nurseries are shut down for the season, so thanks for this hit of retail therapy. You are nothing if not intrepid.

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  13. We might need to get back to Dig this summer. It's been a few years, and it looks like there will be interesting changes.

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    1. It's a fun nursery and each season there are changes worth seeing.

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  14. Those Manzanitas are too cute...but I can't believe you have room for them!

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    1. I don't have room for them or for a lot of the plants I already have. What's your point? :)

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    2. And this is why you are one of my favorite people!

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  15. Beautiful plants, I like them a lot.

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  16. Would you ever consider building a "perfect playlist" of nurseries in your area? I want to get to Dig this year and want to hit as many good nurseries as possible.

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    1. I'd be happy to! The time you have will dictate how many of them you can visit. There are different directions and strings of nurseries that fall in line with each of the paths. It also depends on what you want to see. Let's talk and I'll be happy to line 'em up for you!

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  17. It's fun to go on a virtual visit of nurseries with you. I'll have to put some of the plants on my spring wish list. Always more room for an edible plant, the Vaccinium glauco-album looks interesting, and the tall Mahonias that bloom in winter. Turquoise is my birthstone, and the rusty metal arbors, etc. don't appeal to me, what a fabulous idea to powder-coat them. I'll have to join in the mêlée for the orange and turquoise!

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  18. Ugh - I'm sure my Acacia dealbata will be on my dead list. Looks like a fun place to visit!

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    1. Sorry about your Acacia dealbata. I threw mine in the glass room just before the freeze, turned up the heat, and nearly killed it because I didn't open the door to water during the cold weather and everything got very dry. The cacti and agaves didn't seem to mind. Dig is a great place to visit. Always new ideas, always changing, always a keen eye for trends and great plants.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.