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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Friday, January 3, 2014

Sedum palmeri - My Favorite Plant this week.


Sedum palmeri is charming year round! Whether wearing a cap of snow, ice crystal jewelry, trusses of cheerful yellow flowers or simply blushing, this plant  looks good!



 
Grown in more sun, these in front have taken on a richer winter coloration.




Here is a description from San Marcos Growers:

Sedum palmeri (Palmer's Sedum) - A very neat and attractive smaller succulent that forms small clumps to 8 inches tall of 1-2 inch wide dusty green rosettes of rounded leaves that are held on narrow weak stems that rise upwards and then lie over. In winter over several months appear the brilliant yellow starry flowers  in lateral inflorescences that arch out then downwards. Plant in a well-drained soil in full coastal sun or light shade inland to fairly dense shade - this plant is noted as being one of the most shade-tolerant of sedums but if grown in bright light the green leaves blush with pink. Water regularly to occasionally.  Irrigate more or repot when plants drop lower leaves. This is a great plant for a soil pocket on a wall, as a container specimen or in a hanging basket. It is particularly nice in shade where its cheery yellow flowers are a welcome sight in winter.

 Here in the PNW,  this gem, found at about 10,000 feet in Mexico, has withstood the coldest temperatures we've had in the last 10 years both in the ground and in pots. 

Like many succulents it's very easy to grow and propagate.  Just snap some off and throw them in the ground and you have it!

I'm joining Danger Garden's Favorite Plant this week meme.  Make sure you click over to her site and check out the comments area to see plant favorites of other garden bloggers!
 
To learn more, visit Plant Lust!

24 comments:

  1. This looks like a great candidate for my front garden, draping over the broken concrete wall, maybe?

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    1. Oh yes, it'd be perfect there! If you put it in the sun, it'll blush for you in the winter.

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  2. Wowsa your S. palmeri looks great! Mine lost some leaves during the arctic days but seems to still be alive.

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    1. I've had good luck with this plant because it's so easy to grow. Glad yours is still alive!

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  3. Pretty, durable and easy to grow - what more can you hope for? I'll have to look for it. Too bad so few nurseries here label their succulents.

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    1. We also have our share of "assorted succulents" in some places but our nurseries are usually great at labeling them.

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  4. Oh, I love it's rosy tips! Seems like a great choice for our varying winter temps!

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  5. So pleased to see you favoriting one of the workhorses of the garden. Where would we be without them?

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    1. It has really worked well for me. Grab a handful, throw it where you want it and you're good to go.

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  6. I love this plant! mine does not look as good as yours!! it looks gorgeous! but at least mine it is alive :).

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    1. Mine have looked worse in other winters. Alive is good!

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  7. So pretty. Love these photographs.

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  8. Yes, yes, yes! Many of the Sedums, including this one, are glorious in all seasons. Great post!

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  9. You are right, it is a charmer. The blushing is very attractive, and it looks positively perky in the snow.

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  10. In climates similar to yours and ours this sedum makes for a great addition to a xerophytic bed, a hardy plant combined with borderline ones. It looks so tender and yet it's hardy!

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  11. This is an excellent candidate for my garden, which is in need of some color and life in winter, I'm realizing. This one is a trooper, and so pretty in both the sun and snow!

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  12. lubba lubba this plant. NICE. Especially after the ice and snow....thanks for sharing!

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  13. I am looking for edible, ornamental plants that can take reflected (concrete block) sun/heat in z8b N. FL. I know Sedum sarmentosum foliage is eaten in Korea. This is definitely cuter & has larger leaves. Does it taste decent?

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.