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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Monday, September 17, 2012

Foliage Follow Up September 2012

 
I was going to do a foliage post on palmate leaves but then a couple of other things caught my eye so it's random as usual.
 
NOID acer palmatum


Fatsia japonica 'Spider's Web'


Phytolacca americana 'Silberstein' looks even better when the stems turn magenta and it has purple berries on it.
 Ligularia palmatiloba
 
Begonia luxurians
 Aeonium nobile.  Pay no attention to the blooms of Aeonium 'Topsy Turvy' on the left!
 Colorful foliage of coleus, melianthus and tender succulents lined up to march inside in October.


Tender sedum who spends his winter days on my kitchen windowsill.

Fatsia polycarpa edward needham form

Pam Penick at Digging  is our foliage follow up host.  Be sure to cruise over to her blog to view fabulous foliage from all parts of the globe!

18 comments:

  1. I'm a little envious of your Aeonium nobile!

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    1. Love that plant which I understand is monocarpic:( Hasn't bloomed yet but am thinking of getting some seeds in the spring to make more as I hear they germinate really well. If I do, I'm sure ther'll be extras to share.

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  2. You've featured some really wonderful and unusual foliage -- well, unusual to me at least. I've seen pictures of other variegated Phytolacca, but never one with so much white as yours. I wonder if the berries produce equally variegated babies?

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    1. Supposedly they do but mine is in a fairly shady spot so hasn't produced berries yet. I'll certainly save them if they appear!

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  3. Random is good when your foliage is gorgeous. You may be envious of the palms we grow here and I return that by wishing I could grow acer palmatum.

    As usual, the silvery ones like the phytolacca americana are the standouts to me.

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    1. Thanks. It's funny, I love acer palmatum (so many!) but they're so ubiquitous here that we often take them for granted and think that they'll grow anywhere. Is Texas too dry or too hot for them?

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  4. It's hard not to be envious of all the great plants you Washington gardeners can grow, whether lush or xeric! Thanks for joining in for the foliage celebration again.

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    1. Yes but you Texas gardeners can grow some cool stuff that we can't! Always fun to come to your foliage party!

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  5. I love love love your begonia luxurians and aeonium nobile. Everything is stunning! happy foliage day to you!!!

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  6. It's all wonderful! I especially love that begonia luxurians.

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    1. Thanks. Begonia luxurians is a great plant that flourishes in the shade outside in the summer and makes a fun houseplant during the winter. If it gets too big, cuttings root easily.

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  7. I love the little pearl-like sedums.

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    1. Their so pretty you have to sedum to believe 'em.

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  8. You and Loree have just opened up a whole new world of fatsias to me!

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    1. We both got Needham's lace from Cistus and Spider's web is available at Cistus and other nurseries, too.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.