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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Wednesday Vignette

Recently I've been captivated by a little angel in my garden.  Brugmansia 'Little Angel' to be exact. I'm not usually a fan of double brugmansias as the beauty of  the single form thrills me.  In the fall, this one was on a sale table, out of bloom and with few leaves.  She put on a little growth in the greenhouse, battled spider mites and dropped her leaves again but is recovering nicely and putting forth buds.  This is the first to open, it's wafting evening scent seducing us to seek her out.


Layers of chiffon create a beautiful gown.  Steve Martin said in one of his routines that he believed that women should be put on a pedestal...just high enough that you can look up their dresses.  That's exactly what I've done with this lovely lady.  (Fun fact:  All of the angels mentioned Jewish, Christian, and Islamic scripture have male names although, being supernatural beings, would they need to be male or female? )


Splashes of frills.

Gown designed by Tim Burton?

One can almost hear the rustle of taffeta.  The fragrance of brugmansia has a mild euphoric effect on humans.

She's a pretty little angel and I'm glad she's happy in my garden. 

Thanks to Anna at Flutter and Hum, who each week hosts Wednesday Vignette. Click here to join in the fun!


Check out this interesting article here about Brugmansia and Datura use in a variety of cultures.


36 comments:

  1. "Just up to my elbows is enough."

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  2. She's a beauty! I love the double ones. I just bought a double peach-colored one this spring, but she's still way too small for flowers. Maybe next year. The curlicues are very Tim Burton-ish.

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    1. I've never seen one I didn't like! The fragrance alone is worth growing them but they have beautiful flowers to boot!

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  3. I've never been particularly attracted to these, probably because the thought of something else to overwinter is not appealing. Also, the dangling blooms confuse me, like the upside down tomato plants. What pollinates these, moths?

    Perhaps my hesitance is because I've never seen/smelled one in person?

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    1. Indeed, these are pollinated by moths who are attracted by their heavenly nocturnal fragrance. If you ever sat for a few minutes near one in bloom on a beautiful evening, you'd be sold.

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  4. Reminds me of a skirt of a wedding dress :) lovely!

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  5. You have outdone yourself with these pictures!
    I always coveted Brugmansia, but no green house, no angel.
    Very interesting article about Datura. Jean Auel weaved this plant into her stories of our ancient ancestors in the Earth's Children series.

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    1. Thanks Chava. Someone we know has a garage. Maybe he'd relinquish just a tiny spot for a little angel.

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  6. I'm gonna remember to ask you how you created the effect in the last photo. Neat!

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    1. Just playing with the easy tools on google+ photo editing.

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  7. Shes's a beauty. All the more impressive since I found double white Brugs difficult enough to give them all away at a swap. The greenhouse makes such a big difference getting early blooms. Brugmansia is one of the few exceptions I make for watering plants in the garden because the flowers are so extraordinary.

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    1. The greenhouse has been wonderful thing for wintering things over. I feel so lucky to have it. Brugmansias are worth the water for sure!

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  8. So beautiful. They do seem to suffer from red spider mite inside. I have given them up but seeing yours makes me want to try again, it is exquisite.

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    1. The spider mite problem is awful but spraying with neem oil seems to help if it's done consistently. The fragrance of the neem oil isn't my favorite but it goes away in a day or two.

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  9. That's fabulous, Peter, and I love how you always have the perfect quote and fun fact for the occasion! Made me laugh.... :)

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  10. Absolutely beautiful. I used to have a double white, many years ago, but in the end it grew so big and had to be passed on, maybe it's time to start a new one?!

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    1. Oh yes, a new one! They can always be cut back and root pruned if they get too large.

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  11. I can't imagine her being any more beautiful "in person"! Just amazing in delicate splendor!

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  12. I like brugmansias sooo much. Yours is looking fabulous Peter :)

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    1. Aren't they wonderful plants? Whenever I visit a place where they're hardy in the ground, I want to move!

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  13. Lovely! I think I saw that dress in Corpse Bride. I'm contemplating a couple Brugmansia and relatives.

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  14. Those are the most beautiful Brugmansia photos I've ever seen! I'm not usually a huge fan, but you've convinced me of their bewitching qualities. This white double variety seems like it would be wonderful in a moonlight garden. Just stunning ...

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    1. Thank you, Barbara! If their appearance doesn't get you, their fragrance certainly will!

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  15. The light shining through the petals makes the flower glow - beautiful!

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  16. This post would have been engaging with just the photos...or just the commentary, but together: WOW!

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.