-

-
Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Visiting Bremerton City Nursery

What's better than visiting a nursery for the first time?  Finding out that it's a great place that you'll want to revisit often!  That's just what happened when I visited Bremerton City Nursery last weekend.


I love the entrance arbor and wonder what might have been in those pots on the roof earlier this year.

The nursery is much bigger than it appears from the street and that space is packed with great plants!


 And there is a sun room full of treasures!
 Like this delicious display of tender succulents.

I fell for one of these Solanum pseudocapsicum (Jerusalem Cherry) 

Fun lucite ornaments!


Seems like there was something for everyone here whether you garden on a very small scale


or a considerably larger one.

 Saturday was delightfully sunny, a welcome break from the gray days earlier in the week!  A little plant-centric retail therapy in the sun is just what the doctor ordered!

There's also a coffee shop with outdoor seating on the deck.  

Even as many of the plants are closing up shop for the winter, Helleborus niger is starting to bloom.

Sempervivum  carrying on.

Symphoricarpos x doorenbosii 'Kolmgala'  (Snowberry) is looking lovely.  I was sorely tempted to bring one home but didn't.

Golden autumn foliage on a ginkgo.    

One of the things that I found especially cool about this place is that, while they had holiday stuff as well, their emphasis was still on plants.  I got a Brugmansia 'Jean Pasco,' a variety new to me from the sale area.

The knowledgeable and very nice young woman at the shop gave us a  lesson about wintering carpenter bees when I inquired about a project laid out on a table.  Seems there had been a presentation earlier in the day.  What a treat to learn something new about these fascinating creatures.

What a fun place. There was also an inside shop packed with garden-related stuff and nicely selected gift ware.   Sorry that there aren't any images it the coolness inside; someone got carried away looking at everything!

For more information about this delightful (and open year round) nursery, check out their website here or better yet, go visit in person!  

21 comments:

  1. I so want that large pear, such a statement and fun piece!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You'll have to race me there -- I was thinking the same thing! Which is strange, because I'm not really a glossy finish type of gardener. :)

      Looks like a fun place!

      Delete
    2. The large fruits have been popping up at a few nurseries lately and I also admire them. Let's see, if a plane leaves London at 5:30 a.m. going 600 miles an hour and another leaves St. Louis at 9:00 p.m. going 450 miles an hour, who will arrive at the giant pear in Bremerton first? (All this math is making me tired!)

      Delete
  2. Looks like a cool place! Nurseries with coffee shops that stay open all winter are one of the wonderful perks of living in the PNW.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was fun and a nice day trip along with a few other cool places over that way! (coffee shops - perk..was that intentional? Funny lady!

      Delete
  3. The succulent groupings in the pumpkins are wonderful. This can easily be accomplished with hardy varieties too for an outdoor display.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Love the idea of hardy varieties for outdoor display as well as these sweet inside ones!

      Delete
  4. plants and coffee, honestly, could there be a better pairing? I love exploring all these great spots via your blog!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Plants and coffee (and a nice raspberry scone) can't be beat! Glad you enjoy visiting these fun spots with me!

      Delete
  5. The succulents in the pumpkins are cute, I really like the miniature garden too, kids would enjoy it. Cute ideas for making things from clay.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If I had kids, I think I'd try to interest them in miniature gardens as they really help your imagination fly with possibilities of who might live in those little worlds.

      Delete
  6. Ooh I would have liked one of those little Arabian jasmines next to that giant glass pear. No one nearby seems to be selling them. Helleborus niger the fancy fine-foods-store-plus-florist down the street has at the moment, but for $30 a pot...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The little Arabian jasmines are a common sight in our grocery store plant sections here and are readily available at nurseries. Strange that no on on your side of the country is selling them. We must have a local grower/supplier. Yikes! $30 for a common Helleborus niger? Crazy!

      Delete
  7. I love the succulent-planted pumpkins, I wonder if my squirrels would eat those too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think that the rats/squirrels like the seeds more than the flesh of the pumpkins so you might be safe.

      Delete
  8. The snowberries along our roadside are much sparser than that. I's plant some if I thought they would look more like those.
    I have a friend who has been lusting after a Ming Fey pear sculpture. I'll put her on the trail to this one, which is surely more accessible.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The native ones never seem to produce as heavily as the hybrids. They are such a pretty sight dotting the edge of the woods.

      Delete
  9. Those pumpkin/squash planters are wonderful! what a fun place!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is a fun place and definitely worth visiting!

      Delete
  10. By the way...what is a 'dreaney landscape'?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A dreamy landscape but with really good drainage; they get the Muck out! Or it could b that that's the last name of the resident garden designer.

      Delete

Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.