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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Monday, September 15, 2014

September 2014 Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day

How can September be half over already?  It's hard to believe that fall begins in only a week.  Time flies when you're having fun (or old like me.)  On the fifteenth of each month, Carol at May Dreams Gardens hosts GBBD to help us remember that we can have flowers every month of the year.  Click over to her blog to see what's blooming right now in bloggers' gardens around the world.  Here's some of what's blooming in my garden right now.

Fuchsias are a favorite plant because they bloom for so long and add some nice saturated color at this less floriferous time of year.







Abutilons - Ditto!

Abutilon megapotamicum


Pelargonium that  wintered over in the little glass room because of it's interesting flower shape and color.

Pelargonium 'Crystal Palace Gem' 

Begonias



Early this spring, shopping at Fred Meyer, The begonia tubers seduced me from across the store.  They have a way of doing that.  Anyway, the tubers were in bulk boxes and customers could choose the ones they wanted, place them in a bag along with a handy printed tag to label each variety.  There was a bag of three tubers that another shopper had put together with the label for the red hanging begonia in this picture.  A change of mind had them leave the bag of three inside the red bin.  Thinking it would be lovely to have a hanging basket of red begonias, I grabbed the rejected bag.  Much to my surprise, the resulting basket has two different kinds of begonias, none of which seems to want to hang.  Thus, I have a ugly plastic hanging pot with clashing begonias growing straight up instead of playfully cascading down to cover the ugly pot.  Fun.

Solanum quitoense

Impatiens glandulifera

Lysimachia monelli née  Anagallis monellii AKA Blue Pimpernel

 Echeveria 'topsy turvy' 

 "Assorted succulents"


Still a few gardenias.

Hydrangea 'Pistachio' 

NOID hydrangea I picked up in the floral section of  the grocery store a few years ago because I liked it.  Past their prime, hydrangeas will still look interesting until winter.

Clerodendrum trichotomum has this year produced more flowers than ever before, is still blooming, and is producing lots of ornamental berries!

A few last alstromerias


 Salpiglossis
 Clematis 'Nelly Moser'

Anemone hupehensis


Dahlia


 Persicaria amplexicaulis 'Golden Arrow'


 Geranium 'Ann Folkard' has a fun habit of climbing all over everything. 


Sedum 'Autumn Joy'

There's almost always a rose



or two in bloom.

Colchicum 

Lonicera periclymenum 'INOV71' or 'Caprilia Cream' or 'Sweet Tea'  is all the same plant and it's delightfully fragrant.

What's blooming in your garden this month?  


41 comments:

  1. With a large selection of blooms, it almost looks like a post made in mid summer. Great blooms all (and balls!) :)

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    1. Funny, before I went out with the camera, I was thinking that there was not very much blooming right now. (Why, thank you for noticing!) :)

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  2. So many bloomers, Peter! I love those big "pearls" around the flower bed. Beautiful. I just can't cope with Fuchsias..., but I'd like to. Happy new week!

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    1. It was a surprise when moving here from Alaska to find that many fuchsias are winter hardy here. Happy new week to you!

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  3. The Blue Pimpernel against the chartreuse Pelargonium leafs is stunning.
    Are you happy with your Hydrangea 'Pistachio'? It's a smaller variety if I'm not mistaken.

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    1. I am happy with 'Pistachio.' It's got interesting colors and has grown happily in a pot for a couple of years now. Sometimes when the novelty (like red, green, and purple flowers on an hydrangea) of a new plant wears off, so does the love affair but 'Pistachio' still makes me smile. (Well, except for the fact that I've never turned the pot and the whole plant leans to the front and looks naked on the back.

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  4. That grocery store Hydrangea is beautiful, I love Hydrangea flowers when they get old so much better than when they're new. Do you think you could take some cuttings for me to stick? I would love to have those colors in my garden.

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    1. Happy to take cuttings for you. When is best fall or spring?

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    2. Next spring when it starts to leaf out I think.

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  5. Dear Outlaw gardener, I had no idea that so many plant could grow on the North West side of America. I thought you had cold winters. It is obviously you search the boundaries! Go on and happy Bloggers Blooms Day. Groetjes from - a very mild part- of Holland, Hetty

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    1. In the Pacific Northwest, we benefit from warming ocean currents so our winters are wet but low temperatures in the winter don't often go much below freezing. We do get occasional cold blasts from the arctic which may give us a week or two of very cold weather (six or seven degrees C.) but in some winters we get lucky and no such events occur. The brugmansia and echiverias are brought inside during the winter.

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  6. Oh that bowling ball circle caught me by surprise and had me smiling, love it!

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  7. You have so many wonderful blooms Peter and your Dahlias are just magnificent! Many of our hydrangeas here on Long Island didn't bloom this year due to the bad winter we had so I am enjoying yours!

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    1. Sorry to hear about your hydrangeas! Every few years we have to prune the larger ones back and we loose blooms for the year.

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  8. Those fuchsias are fantastic! All the many colors in your September garden are just lovely and I love the whimsy of the ball circle. We all need a bit of whimsy in our gardens and our lives.

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    1. We're fortunate to live where they'll grow with little help from us other than cutting them back in the spring. Glad you like the ball circle, I just changed it from the bricks that have been there for years and think it's fun.

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  9. You've got a regular bloomfest going! I love that Abutilon megapotamicum. You summer posts always remind me that I need to create some decent shade beds for fuchsias - I miss them. As to the "assorted succulents" - hmm. Happy GBBD Peter!

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    1. I like that Abutilon a lot myself because it's so hardy and dependable for me. Here we can grow hardy fuchsias in the full sun. Well, what passes for full sun here.

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  10. So many interesting blossoms. The only one we have in common is hydrangea -- our hydrangeas are all brown and crispy except for some scattering late efforts.

    Fuchsias point up why we grow different plants. They love cool. Lovely.

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    1. It's fun to see the regional differences in what we can grow! You have many heat lovers in your garden that never get really happy here.

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  11. Summer's going out with style at your place.

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    1. Well at least with a lot of flowers. Don't know about style.

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  12. Those begonias don't clash - not in my garden anyway! And the abutilon mega-something look like a jillion colorful butterflies. Your garden is wonderful.

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    1. The begonias are o.k. together but being in a hanging pot, they look kind of silly growing straight up. Glad you like my garden!

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  13. Clerodendrum trichotomum looks interesting. I had to look it up. And joy oh joy, I can grow it in the UK. Although at a mighty 6 metres tall I will have to think very carefully about where it might go.
    p.s. love your header pic!

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    1. Clerodendrum trichotomum can be kept much smaller if you don't want a tree. It does send suckers up everywhere and wants to form a thicket. Fortunately, they pull fairly easily.

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  14. Lots of lovely blooms and stunning photographs. I love your way of growing colchicums, what fun. I have never seen Hydrangea Pistachio, it' s gorgeous, I' m going to look out for it here.

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    1. Thanks, Chloris. Hydrangea 'Pistachio' was new here a year or two ago but now I see it everywhere so I'll bet it's available there by now.

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  15. I'm ready for the fall ! I'd love to be able to do some gardening ! Lovely blooms you have, Peter. Happy Bloom Day !

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    1. I've not been able to do much gardening other than keeping the pots watered since school started. Things always get fairly messy looking around here come September.

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  16. I am envious of your Abutilon and especially that amazing Salpiglossis -- I'd love to see some macro shots of that!

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    1. The abutilons are only borderline hardy here but you could bring them in for the winter and store them dormant in a basement. Salpiglossis is an easy annual but I'm not sure if it is a heat lover or not. Your macro shots are always so beautiful; do you have a macro lens or do you use the screw on the end of the existing lens things?

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  17. Wow, you have lots of great late-season colour here! I love your fuchsias... and the colour changing hydrangeas are beautiful!

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    1. Thanks Ruth! Hope you had a great Bloom Day!

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  18. You have such a lot of flowers blooming in your garden, wonderful for September! I really like your Abutilon, fantastic plant.

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    1. I love abutilons too but just wish they all were as hardy as megapotamicum!

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  19. So many beautiful flowers. Don't the fuchsias just love this time of the year? Love the blue of the anagalis. great plant.

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    1. We share the love of fuchsias among a lot of other groups of plants! Blue flowers are some kind of magic!

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  20. Echeveria 'topsy turvy' is the one for me, if I could only chose one. Nothing flowering in my garden yet, but this rain might produce something...

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    1. It would be hard to choose just one Echeveria! There are so many incredible ones!

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.