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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Monday, September 22, 2014

Heavenly Blue for the Last Day of Summer.

Driving down a busy four lane street on Saturday a color combination on the far side of the street caught my eye so I had to turn around and investigate.

Cosmos and Heavenly Blue morning glory (Ipomoea tricolor 'Heavenly Blue' although Wikipedia says..."current taxonomy and systematics are in flux" so it may be called something else by the time you read this.)  make great bed mates.


Even without the cosmos, the morning glory looked so happy and healthy!  I've tried growing this from both seed and small plants but have never been very successful.  'Grandpa Ott' grows and reseeds for me nicely but not so much 'Heavenly Blue.'  A heat lover, it's had a perfect summer!

Let's go in for a closer look!


This is similar to the blue of meconopsis over which we swoon.  

The star pattern in morning glory leaves is sweet.  Don't tell anyone but I've been known to admire the flowers of the dreaded weedy morning glory (field bindweed,) a nuisance in gardens.

This sighting has me fired up to give growing them another try! 

Do you grow morning glories?  Do you have any tricks for growing this variety?


A creative small garden faces the street.

Along the driveway.

A fun touch by the front door upon which I was tempted to knock.  There was a gate to a side yard and perhaps more interesting plantings behind.  

Then I noticed the sign on the right.  One does not mess with a grumpy bear with a sign that says "Go Away."  I took his advice and left wondering what the rest of the garden might look like.


I hope that your last day of summer is heavenly and that the coming of autumn doesn't make you feel blue. Happy new week all!

26 comments:

  1. Grumpy bear dashed your hopes of seeing the back garden. Who knows he might be kinder at another time :)

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    1. Maybe I'll try back in the spring when the gardener might be out working and in a chatty mood.

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  2. Such a cheerful and welcoming garden to be guarded by a grump.

    Those morning glories are so striking when in bloom. If they like heat they would be happy in my garden so I might give it a try. We do have a couple of native Ipomoeas that are mostly white with purple.

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    1. Gee, that's what people say about my garden and me...

      I bet they'd grow well for you!

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  3. I did have a very pleasant last day of summer, it was surprisingly so warm and sunny here. Rain is coming, and I'm more or less ready for it, I guess. What a bummer that you couldn't see more of the garden. The morning glory is quite beautiful. I've grown them in the past, when we lived in Massachusetts, but not here.

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    1. Glad to hear that you're ready for the rain festival that'll start tomorrow! Other morning glories do well for me, especially if we have a warm spring, but not Heavenly blue. Worth trying again.

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  4. Guffaw. Go Away, indeed! Why would anyone plant an interesting garden to draw one in and then dash hopes of seeing more?

    Morning glories are a nuisance field weed here. I pulled up a bindweed volunteer by the tractor shed this morning and saw no beauty in it.

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    1. Bindweed is a nuisance here as well so you think their pretty cousins would also be happy.

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  5. The phrase "last day of summer" makes me feel like holding up a grumpy "go away" sign too.

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  6. I have tried growing morning glory without success. Binder weed does well here though.:-/
    Our last day of summer is looking gray so far.

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    1. Thank goodness it cleared up by afternoon so we could see a little sun before we have rain for the rest of the week!

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  7. 'Heavenly Blue' covers entire sunny hillsides in October in San Miguel de Allende, MX, a breathtaking sight. I grow what was sold to me as a TX native Gregg's Morning Glory, a tiny-leaved vine prolific with enormous extra-long trumpeted flowers of a delicate summer sky blue hue which, IMO, rival the more intense blue of 'Heavenly'. The blooms of Gregg's are a true trumpet, not as flat as 'Heavenly'. Tried to find a photo so I could send along a link, but none I saw even approaches its beauty in real life. Gregg's (if that's actually the correct name of what I have) blooms spring and fall and then intermittently all year 'til frost.
    You think maybe Mr. Bear is only funnin'? I have a sign above my front door that says "Nobody gets in to see the Wizard. Not nobody. Not nohow", but there's a ruby slipper sitting on the bench so I don't think anyone is scared away.

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    1. Gregg's sounds beautiful! Imagining a hillside covered with blue morning glories has me swooning!

      I think that Mr. Bear might just be toying with me but you never know with bears! Maybe I was just being cowardly and need to come to your garden to get courage.

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  8. How can the white, weedy ones be so rampant and 'Heavenly Blue' so picky? I've tried and failed to grow one and banish the other.
    When I worked for the census I encountered a chained gate with a sign that read "turn back or die". When I finally made contact, the resident was sweet as could be. Not that I would necessarily argue with the bear.

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    1. It always seems to work out that way doesn't it?

      Bears can be unpredictable but then, so can people. You were a brave woman!

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  9. It's a plant from my childhood. Blue Morning Glory used to envelope the fence in our garden in Russia long time ago. We never considered it as a weed, because it stayed on that fence and behaved!

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  10. I grew a beautiful blue perennial morning glory in the backyard of my old house. It came with a warning suggesting that it was best grown in a pot because it could be invasive. I had it in a pot for a time but then decided, if I kept it under careful watch in my tiny garden, I could surely keep it under control. This proved not to be the case. It wove its way through all my shrubs and created an overhang of gorgeous blue flowers. It was wonderful - until it was attacked en masse by giant white fly. Removing it took years...

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    1. Sounds like quite a thug in your climate! Here it has the decency to die come winter.

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  11. You know I agree with Alan 150%!

    I did appreciate the "current taxonomy and systematics are in flux" so it may be called something else by the time you read this" disclaimer. I think that could be said about every plant every day.

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    1. The only constant in life is change, right?

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  12. I think the go-away sign is humor! Summer left a while ago here, but it isn't really fall here, either. But the shorter days...bummer.

    Glad the morning glories cheered you up - really stunning. Other morning glories are pass-alongs here I never see for sale, but tough!

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    1. I'm sure the go-away sign was just for fun.

      Interesting to know that morning glories will take desert conditions!

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  13. Ha, I love that bear!! And they are very pretty morning glories.

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    1. Isn't it fun? One of my favorite door mats says, "Leave."

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.