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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day October 2013


How time has flown!  It's already  October 15,  time to once again join Carol at May Dreams Gardens and garden bloggers all over the world to show what's blooming in our gardens mid month.   Here are a few of the blooms I found in my garden after work today.

Bless their sturdy hearts, a few Shasta daisies are still blooming. 

Salvia 'Amistad'  has flourished and is full of blooms reminding me of seeing it in the experimental garden at  Sunset headquarters this summer during the Garden Bloggers' Fling.   Here's hoping that  they survive the winter for those of us who planted it!


Salvia 'Hot Lips'  is still going strong but much of the red has faded with the cooler temperatures.  Such cute little dimples!


 Shrub roses in the parking strip still hanging in there.


Sedum somethingorother. 
 Salvia 'Blue Angel'   survived the winter in the ground but was late to emerge and has just started blooming this month.  The color is intense but won't be around long.

Mahonia 'Soft Caress' is just starting to open its buds.

Pelargoniums will bloom until frost slows them down.

Tuberous Begonias



Begonia boliviensis is seeing pink this year!  (and white and yellow in the new sparkler series.)



The plant formerly known as asters.

Japanese anemones.

Impatiens omeiana

Another perennial impatiens.


Abutilon that surprised me by coming back this year.  You may see an abutilon megapotamicum in the background.  They're tired of always being photographed for my bloom day posts and decided they wanted a cameo role this time. 
 
Hardy fuchsias. This one wasn't supposed to be hardy, it was a hanging basket gift that I left sitting on the ground in a flower bed a few years ago and it just keeps coming back and blooming.


This diminutive little one started out as a little one foot gallon pot of cuteness last summer and is now at least 15 feet tall  and we can walk under it.
 
 
 Fuchsia Autumnale
 
Last but not least is this noid Dahlia that I once again forgot until I saw some big pink blooms popping out from behind the brush in one of my beds.
 
 
This was not placed here but rather the bloom fell over on the fleur-de-lis which gave it some support.  Couldn't have planned it better!
 
Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day is hosted by Carol at May Dreams Gardens on the fifteenth of each month.  Click on over to her site to see what's blooming in gardens from all of the round earth's imagined corners. (Thank you Mr. Donne)


38 comments:

  1. Great selection Peter and a cheer to see at this time of the year :)

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    1. One of the nice things about bloom day is seeing blooms every month of the year.

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  2. It might not be too late to take cuttings of the salvia and I was told that you can get them through the winter here (UK) by making a sort of wigwam of straw over them - might be worth a go. Arent impatiens omeiana flowers disappointing, I want to tell mine to try harder!

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    1. My other salvias have been hardy here with no protection so I've great expectations for 'Amastad.'

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  3. You are growing the many plants I have had trouble with... Happy Gbbd!

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  4. I just noticed my Impatiens omeiana flowers a few days ago. I think it's been blooming for a while, but because I hadn't looked closely, I thought it was just a lot of bad spots on the leaves. They really are dreadful flowers.

    You have so much still flowering. And you used the nasty "s" word in that postcard above. You made me shudder.

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    1. Sorry about the 's' word, blame it on Whittier!

      Not dreadful flowers, just not the stars of the garden. Gotta love anything that is just starting to bloom now.

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  5. Just last week I discovered Mahonia 'Soft Caress'. I'm considering adding it to my Seattle garden, in a shady spot. How do you like this plant? Tell it to me straight, I can take it.
    And what do you mean "The plant formerly known as asters"? What's it called now?
    I still call it aster. Is that a faux pas? :-(

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    1. I love Mahonia 'Soft Caress' It grew happily in an ornamental pot for me for a couple of years does well in containers. It's now in the ground in not the best soil in the world and gets largely ignored water wise in the summer. It's grown like a champ, has that gorgeous foliage year round and blooms late in the season to help tide the humming birds over until the even later mahonias begin blooming and I remember to fill the humming bird feeders. Can't think of a single negative thing about it. You will love it!

      Several years ago, New World Asters were reclassified and renamed Symphyotrichum and Aster divaricatus was excommunicated from the group and renamed Eurybia divaricata. I still call them asters because I'm a curmudgeon.

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    2. Thank you for the helpful information. I'll be getting me a Soft Caress this week. I'm so excited! And will continue to call my Asters by their old name (a pretty name too). I don't need that other tongue twister of a name; I have enough confusion in my life :-)

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  6. Wow quite the floral show Peter! Oh and I'm with Alison...what were you thinking using the "S" word?

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    1. I'm truly sorry but I know that you secretly (or not so secretly, I've been reading your blog for quite a while) like 's' Besides, it creates a nice insulating layer over the beds and makes schools close.

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  7. For such fragile looking things, the fuchsias just keep going and going. You have some beauties. I put in an itty bitty white one ('Hawkshead'). Totally wrong placement if it performs half as well as yours, but I wouldn't complain.
    They're renaming Asters? Is nothing sacred?

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    1. No, nothing is sacred and the new names they've picked are not particularly lovely.

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  8. That dahlia looks fabulous on the fleur-de-lis. I like your sedum somethingorother, and your blue salvias. But I am shocked at the thought of a 15 ft fuchsia! I never see them growing here (I'll have to try one, just to see), but I didn't even know that was possible!

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    1. If you were a bad gardener and had planted the fuchsia near a supporting arbor in the deep shade but where it could reach up for the full sun it really wants (at least here) you would see the same results. It's amazing what a plant will do to survive!

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  9. Everything is so pretty!! I especially like Begonia boliviensis

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    1. Thank you Lisa! I've never met a begonia that I didn't like except the ones they use as annuals in mass bedding schemes.

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  10. Such a nice selection of blooms. I thinking I'll did up my tender Salivas and bring them into the sunroom to over winter...very soon !

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  11. I love the hardy Fuschia with the white flowers. Is Salvia Amistad the one we saw at Sunset Gardens?

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    1. It sure is and it's supposed to be hardy to zone 7 so I'm putting it to the test.

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  12. With so many tender plants still in glorious bloom, I can understand why you bemoan the approach of fall (and the frost it brings in your area of the country). I'm still looking for Salvia 'Amistad' locally and may have to resort to mail order, although I suspect that will have to wait until next year as the nearest supplier appears to be in the PNW. I'm going to put those Begonia boliviensis on my wish list for next year too.

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    1. Always happy to add fuel to the plant lust fire!

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  13. Your 'Amistad' is so much beefier than mine! I think maybe mine resents being in a container.

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    1. Could be. I got mine on sale at Fred Meyer and it looked pretty sad, lots of yellow leaves like they had let it dry out horribly or overwatered it. Anyway it got put in the ground the day I bought it and revived very nicely.

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  14. Your selection of fuschias is lovely! I especially like the little white and pale pink one. I only had a few to begin with and now don't have a single one left after some ruthless space apportioning. As my garden gets shadier and shadier, I may be reconsidering those decisions...

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    1. Their ability to bloom in the shade is what makes them work for me as I also have growing shade areas. Darned timber bamboo!

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  15. It never occured to me to put my fuchsias in my bloom day post--glad you did, they are very happy in October now that the heat is gone..

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    1. Since we seldom get above 80 in the summer, the fuchsias bloom happily all season log.

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  16. You have make beautiful photos!
    Greetings, RW & SK

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  17. Your Salvia 'Hot Lips' really do have cute dimples.;-) The red tuberous begonia is beautiful. I hope to grow Impatiens balfourii from seed for next year, Ruellia didn't grow for me. I enjoy seeing yours.

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    1. I've heard that I. balfourii seeds freely all over the garden so I'll hope for you that it's easy to start from seed. If not, I'm sure I'll have extra plants to give away next spring.

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  18. Beautiful flowers for October bloom day. I think we must be getting our September weather now. Everything looks so pretty in the sunshine. Have a great weekend.

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  19. somethingorother- I have a few of those)):-

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.