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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

A Very Scary Visit to Watson's

Is this a comment about patrons staying a little too long at the nursery?  Oh sure, pack a lunch, stay all day, in fact why not spend eternity here!


Flowering cabbage/kale looks gorgeous to me but some of you find it quite frightening.  BOO!
Like alien arms, the leaves draw you toward the insatiable mouth of the monster.

Hey, where did Alison go?  We'll miss her.

I have one of these that grows in a pot and I'm very tempted to let it loose in my parking strip.  I've heard that they'll take over.  Does anyone have experience with Physalis alkekengi set free in the garden?




Nearly pink pumpkins or just a winter squash trying to fit in for the season?

Is there a message here with 'Blonde Ambition' in full bloom/seed with death close at hand?

Don't be frightened, Loree, the weeping Atlas Cedar can't hurt you.  It may be creepy but it's tied up...for the moment...

We interrupt the scariness for some pictures of lovely foliage.





The beautiful variegated foliage of Callicarpa dichotoma 'Summer Snow' (beauty berry) charmed me into buying one earlier this summer.  The blooms on this one are just opening now as are mine at home.  This is supposed to happen in the spring and purple berries are supposed to follow in autumn.  Do you suppose they'll eventually fall into line?  Anyway aren't the purple hues of the autumn foliage pretty?


Disanthus cercidifolius, one of the best shrubs for autumn color, would have come home with me if there was a single inch of empty space in my garden.


Meanwhile, inside, there are more fun displays.

Love the velvet pumpkins! 

Clever idea!

My garden may just need one or two of these.  Perhaps growing out of the bowling ball bed?


Ornamental peppers. 

A new (to me) Schefflera.  Who could resist that interesting variegation and nifty scalloped leaves.


Has Peperomia always been this pink?

Everyone could  squeeze one more Sansevieria in somewhere.  The require almost no light and even less water. 
x Groptovelia 'Opolina'  so soft so pretty, so ghostly.






30 comments:

  1. I know what you mean about the Disanthus, I was at Portland Nursery last weekend and they had the MOST glorious Witch Hazel I've ever seen...the autumn coloring was amazing. Sadly, it had to remain behind...sigh.

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  2. I've been tempted by Disanthus too. The foliage is very similar in shape to my Cercis (hence the second part of its name). It looks like it turns a really beautiful shade of red in the fall. What a great tree.

    Oh no, I heard this plant calling "Feed me!" and now Peter has disappeared too....

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    1. Also love the blue green color of Disanthus in the summer and it stays pretty small! You could surely fit one in!

      This disappearing thing is fun!

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  3. I always enjoy a bloggy visit to Watsons! The displays, pumpkins, and plants are gorgeous.

    I see Alison has managed to return from her near cabbage experience.

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  4. All those decorations look frighteningly fun! A fleeting moment as the moment Halloween passes out comes the christmas decorations...

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    1. I was going to say something similar. How I prefer Halloween decorations!

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    2. So sad to see Halloween go. I like looking at pumpkins, gourds, and indian corn all the way through Thanksgiving.

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  5. How funny I saw exactly that same B.A.C. box and bondage treatment at another nursery recently. I do like that it's tied up, unable to reach out its tentacles and twist them around your neck...

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    1. Oh Loree, we all know that the BAC could break free and get you any time! You might want to sleep with one eye open!

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  6. Fun scary visit. Enjoying these post on the NW nurseries. Our Disanthus didn't make it - not enough water.

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    1. Well, I know where you can get another... Glad you liked the fun visit!

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  7. It's funny to see this 'scary nursery'. Flowering cabbage is so pretty, has different colors and I love them, though they are fall blooming plants. The last photo of 'Opolina' is beautiful, I can feel its softness.

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    1. Here in our mild climate, flowering cabbage looks good all winter long. I'm glad you liked the funny scary nursery!

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  8. Who knew that after we've moved on our remains would still like to picnic? I guess if we expire in a nursery that makes perfect sense.

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    1. You think we like to haunt nurseries now, just wait!

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  9. Just recently I looked into Physalis alkekengi; I saw it grow in a contained area and was charmed. But when I read up on it I got scared by it's vigorous growing habit. If you take it out of the pot you may never get control of it again. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1894/#b
    Scary plants aside, the skeleton's picnic display is wild, and I LOVE the white pumpkin, it's so "ghosty" and out of this world. Is it it's natural color?

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    1. I've also been repeatedly warned about Physalis alkekengi being set free but I'm tempted to throw it in some inhospitable spot and see what happens. The largest two white pumpkins in the inside display were fiberglass or thick plastic of some sort. The others are real, are naturally white but have orange flesh so carving them and lighting them from inside is really glorious!

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  10. You keep on surprising me with your posts, Peter. Thank you for this scary visit with you. Have a scary Wednesday evening... ;O)

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    1. And may you have a not too scary Halloween on Thursday, Satu!

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  11. I usually hate ornamental cabbage (kale?) but your photos makes them look so--well, almost beautiful.

    Great post. Put me in a perfect Halloween mood!

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    1. Almost beautiful is better than ugly, right? Glad that you're in the spirit of the holiday!

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  12. Ornamental kale really does look like it has a mouth. Personally, I wouldn't poke a finger in there.

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  13. I avoided the Halloween displays at local nurseries this year, not wanting to be tempted to spend on non-living garden elements, but it looks as though I missed some fun. I've hauled out my old skeleton and a few other things, though - I wish I'd thought to put my skeleton in costume but then there's always next year. Thanks for sharing your visit to Watson's.

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    1. Because I seldom am tempted to buy decorations anymore, it's a great time for me to visit. Likewise with the Christmas stuff, I admire it but have no desire to own any more of it. (o.k. maybe every now and then but it's nothing like the seemingly endless desire for new plants.)

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  14. Great way to celebrate the season! I don't think we have any place as colorful and baleful ;o) as Watson's in our area, but your post inspires me to shop about. When the little ones come to our door tonight, I will remember to scare them with kale!

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    1. That would surely make their blood run cold!

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  15. Ooh scary post! :) A few years ago I spent way too much money mail ordering a way too tiny Disanthus that promptly died in my "care." I would really love to find another one someday, not that I have room for it. ... I think that bony couple have worn out their welcome, among other things.

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    1. I'm going to enjoy Disanthus in other gardens. The bony couple just set out to loose a few pounds and become more healthy. Guess they took the fitness thing a bit too far. Oops.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.