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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Friday, August 23, 2013

So Then the Car Said...

"You know, Valley Nursery is only thirty minutes away, let's go there."  Leaving this delicious pot  ad Elandan, the car left the parking lot and sped off toward Poulsbo. (Previous posts here.)



It's always fun to visit the Cryptomeria japonica 'Christatas'  This is one of those curiosity plants that I'd definitely have in my garden if only I had a lot more space. It's easy to see where the common name  Cock's Comb Cryptomeria came from.

This one was talking to me but it's language was too cryptic for my understanding.


Wonder what this guy thinks about the whole thing?



Nothing says summer like beautiful and fragrant oriental lilies.  There's something about the simple elegance of their shape that makes me love them.  What do you think of the new doubles?  They don't float my boat but some people think they're the bees knees. 

Schefflera taiwaniana 'Yuan Shan'  

Schefflera brevipedunculata

Is the gnome stuck on that cactus?  Do you suppose that he'll be covered in glochids when he approaches that cute-looking opuntia?  I'm convinced that they can actually throw these!


Looking for answers to life's perplexing questions?  Valley's got you covered!



Valley is a large garden center type of place a plant store rather than a nursery.  (A nursery grows its own stock.)  This place always carries a great selection of lots of plants and have had, from time to time, some pretty unusual offerings.  Their house plant section is always a treat.  I wasn't prepared for the big surprise of seeing many tables full of plants from San Marcos Growers! 

Are those Leucadendrons lurking there?  And Agonis flexuosa on the far left?  (dark purple leaves with a minty smell!)

Why yes, yes they are and here's  a table full of Grevilleas.


 Leucadendron 'Jester' captured my heart in several of the gardens we visited on the Garden Bloggers' Fling in June.  Here was one just waiting to jump into my car.  It's as if all those seductive plants, hardy in California, followed me home to Washington.  (Yes, it's one more thing that will have to come inside for the winter.  Try not to think about it and whatever you do, don't remind me when I'm in the middle of the seasonal move that I could have simply left the plant there.)

 
 
 Holy Mary, it's a Kalanchoe forest! 

And, and, and, could that be a whole bunch of Calothamnus villosus  or  Silky Net Bush that tugged at my heart when I saw one in bloom at WeHop in the spring?



Oh yeah, baby!  And it was also available in sweet one gallon pots but the plants themselves were almost as large as the ones in bigger pots. 

 
 
 Cute little button buds of  Globularia x indubia.  Delightful but only hardy to twenty degrees F.  Not fascinating enough to haul around.

Those Agaves 'Mr. Ripple' in two gallon pots were pretty reasonably priced but I have (forgive me Loree) too many Agaves already.  And we'll be visiting here again soon.

Lastly,  one of my favorite (they're all pretty fab.) members of the Araliacea, Trevesia palmate.  The emerging  leaves resemble little silver snowflakes, it's relatively easy and can take fairly low light conditions when it comes inside for the winter to be a houseplant.

What a spectacular surprise to find so many plants, unusual to see in our climate, in one visit.   I'm so glad that Valley decided to take a chance with these exciting plants and I hope it's profitable for them so that they'll  keep offering  fun stuff like this!  

Thanks, car,  for taking us on this surprise visit!

My wish for you is that your every nursery visit will be filled with as many happy surprises as I experienced on this visit! 

39 comments:

  1. Such a fascinating place. I love the white dragon container, flamboyant rooster and the whimsical head planters in your previous post. Even if we can't take some of these objects and plants such as Globularia x indubia, home, its great feast for the eyes and make us feel thoroughly contented.

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    1. You're right, it's a joy just to see these things and know that beauty exists without having to bring everything home.

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  2. Wait I don't understand this bit about "simply leaving the plant there" what, you can do that?????

    (I'm also having trouble with the phrase "too many agaves")

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    1. I know, it's like I'm speaking a foreign language or something. There's a rumor going around that some people say that they actually think about the consequences of their plant purchases.
      The real plan was to wait until the promotional postcard from Valley came in the mail telling me how many promotional points I earned this season and then go back and get Mr. Ripple for a song.

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  3. It IS just like those fabulous plants followed you home from San Francisco! I'm surprised to see so many Leucadendrons. They have some cool stuff there.

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    1. It'll be our first stop on the September Heronswood Port Townsend extravapalooza.

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  4. The only place my car takes me is to work and the grocery store. Could your car talk to my car, maybe? I'd like to see some leucadendrons too.

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    1. If your car would drive you up to Valley Nursery, you could see them. Maybe your car needs an alignment, tire rotation or attitude adjustment.

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  5. The talking Cryptomeria bears a striking resemblance to Kermit the frog. I'm with Heather: maybe your car could give seminars.

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    1. Silly me, I forgot to mention that my car will be giving a talk at the Northwest Flower and Garden Show. I'll be in the parking structure on level B. The title of the presentation is "Hauling butt to all of the coolest nurseries in the PNW." Your vehicle shouldn't miss it!

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  6. Best not to sign the car up for a movie contract, some of those cars are not so nice as to take you to such special places. The kalanchoe forest is pretty cool.

    Talking plants, oh my. So it looks like Spongebob can answer all of my questions too.

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    1. Thanks for the car advice.

      Oh no, SpongeBob IS the answer!

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  7. I'm with you on those lilies. Makes me think I might need glasses...

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    1. Nice to know I'm not alone. Most folks rave about them and they are different but just not my cup of tea.

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  8. So many cool things. You really do have some wonderful nurseries in your neck of the woods

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    1. You're right, we're pretty spoiled that way. Just today a couple of women walked down the sidewalk looking at the neglected parking strip and asked if I'd traveled the world collecting plants. My answer was that I'd just traveled to nurseries in the area. Sometimes I love living here!

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  9. You certainly know, and know how to find, exotic plants.
    Not fond of the double lilies either.

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    1. I can read a plant label with the best of 'em. Although I have a lot of good old standby plants in my garden, I'm attracted to plants that are new to me or impossible to grow in our climate.

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  10. What a beautiful cock! Nice gadgets are in the garden. Ah, the lilies ... just beautiful :)

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    1. Why thank you, Joanna. I'm glad you like the lilies.

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  11. Not crazy about the double lilies, but I like the buds of Globularia.

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  12. Looks like a nice place. So many garden centers, so little money...

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  13. Oh yes, the car does speak to one sometimes, doesn't it? I don't know if I'm more proud when I listen to it and find goodies, as you did, or when my willpower just says "no." That succulent fairy garden gave me a few ideas. Thanks!

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    1. When I feel best is when the car takes me somewhere and instead of buying the plants myself, I talk someone else into buying them. It's easy to find a poor unsuspecting person admiring a plant and push them over the edge. For me, it's the thrill of the hunt as much as it is bringing home the trophy.

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  14. Great plants and some of the accessories and garden ornaments you feature do make me smile :)

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    1. Glad the fun things make you smile! Hope you're having a great weekend!

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  15. What a lovely nursery, once again! How many different nurseries have you visited, Peter? Happy Sunday!

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    1. It's hard to remember how many nurseries I visit on a fairly regular basis. I'll be going back to work again on Monday so soon I won't be able to visit as many places.

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  16. The table full of agaves and succulents was awesome! You really have so many wonderful garden stores and nurseries close to you ~

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    1. You have a lot of stellar places in your area too! It's always fun to see interesting plants!

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  17. dear og, such a cheerful, funny post, as well as informative. But it's also a dangerous post. That first plant, Cryptomeria, is a real character. I think it was talking to me through the screen. It wants to grow in my garden. It says if there's not enough space, remove lesser plants and make room! It's being bossy, taking advantage of the fact I've fallen in love with it. Lucky it's on the other side of the world, other wise I'd lose my free will.

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    1. Sue, the Cryptomeria told me that it will continue haunting you until you find one to plant in your garden because it's fallen in love with you too! Isn't love grand?

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  18. Stalking from humans is not nice and is against the law. I wonder if when it comes from a plant it has a different meaning?

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    1. Oh sure, we love it when plants stalk us!

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  19. Oh no... another nursery to explore. The tender items like the Leucadendron are our weakness and it is always fun to find them here in the NW.

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  20. We gardeners are an interesting lot. I moved from zone three to zone 8 many years ago and was amazed at the huge variety of plants that are hardy here. Now I lust after, grow, and baby even more tender things. Crazy.

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  21. I probably would have grabbed that Leucadendron too. It such a beauty.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.