-

-
Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Friday, August 30, 2013

A Friday Quickie Raw and Uncensored

Busy, busy, busy time of the year for me so today here's a few uncensored pictures through my dirty kitchen window of  part of my neglected garden.  (Long boring story but the nice thing about gardens is that there's always another season to make it better.) 
The sweet perfume of Clerodendrum bungei (pink flowers) wafts beautifully over this part of the garden which causes me to forgive them for their rampant running habit;  after all, they're easy enough to pull up.  If left unchecked, these would take over the world. There's also a Clerodendrum trichotomum  (I think it's var. fargesii because its leaves are not as large and furry as  my other C. trichotomum, it hasn't taken on the tree-like proportions of the latter and it blooms later.) Anyway, it smells great around there right now!


You may remember this view from May.

It looks quite different now.  Floating plants on the pond and the foliage all around obscure a lot of what's visible at other times of the year. 

The potted agaves and other succulents belong back in the danger gardenette.  I pulled it apart to clean up the bamboo  that was encroaching and never put them back.  Oh well, it'll be time to pull them back inside for winter soon.

The pot sitting empty back there is for a hosta I recently bought which badly needs to be planted.  Oh well, it's raining out right now.  There's always tomorrow, right?

This lovely lady is disgusted that I didn't remove the bamboo litter from her hat before taking her picture.  She's looking directly at a slew of plants in pots that need to go into the ground.  She's so judgmental!

How has your garden season been this year?  Full of work, great projects, and efficiency or more of a time of maintaining and planning for the future?   Have a happy and productive weekend all!

38 comments:

  1. If your beautiful and lush garden has been neglected it's not showing in the photos. It's nice to see your garden once in while and it looks great from here dirty window and all.

    Our gardening season will begin in a week or so when temps get below triple digits.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Shirley. I can't imagine triple digits on a regular basis, you're stronger person than I my friend!

      Delete
  2. But wasn't the rain nice? Your gardens are looking vivacious and happy, very pleasant indeed. I love the lady with the fern hair... Mostly I liked your post title Peter. You should be in advertising.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The rain was glorious! All o plants outside look so much greener and happier since the rain came.

      Delete
  3. If your windows are setting the standard for dirty then I'd better get out the Invisible Glass quick!

    Due to the height of summer heat we usually get around here in July and sometimes August, garden projects go by the wayside. I'm about to regroup and tackle one or two before fall cleanup begins. Hope to do a late summer spiff up this weekend. All in all it's been a good season.

    Enjoy the long weekend!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good to hear that you'll be getting out there and tackling a couple of projects before fall cleanup!

      Have the best Labor Day Weekend ever!

      Delete
  4. I don't quite understand what's neglected in that lovely part of your garden..I love the bond and those beautiful fish. Your garden is so lush and green. Happy weekend, Peter!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I usually don't have things lying around waiting to be put away. Thanks and you have a happy weekend too, Satu!

      Delete
  5. Neglected looks good on you, or, err, your garden.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My garden, myself (sounds like a book title.) both neglected but both seem to be just fine.

      Delete
  6. Indeed a lovely lady :)I think this year's balcony was beautiful, but next year will be held white.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow, a white balcony next year. Very pretty!

      Delete
  7. For a neglected garden, it looks pretty damn good. I really appreciated our recent rain, I was getting so sick of watering. I'm planning and maintaining, and wondering what our winter will be like (I know, the dreaded W word, the F word is bad enough.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You need to use the D word (Denial.) We've still got a few more weeks of summer even though Labor Day is the last day of my freedom. Get out, enjoy, pretend that summer will last forever.

      Delete
  8. I have to echo Alison's comment. Where's the neglected part of the garden? Because all I saw was lush fabulosity. :o)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are both too kind. The neglect is the pots sitting around where they don't belong, the weeds growing between the bricks in the pathway. There are lots of little things like that that I'm usually more on top of that are being neglected this summer. Most of the plants are doing fine.

      Delete
  9. It's so nice to see a more overall picture of your garden. And like everyone here, I can't see the neglect - it looks wonderful. I was only familiar with Clerodendrum trichotomum, so your lovely C. bungei is a total and delightful surprise! As for my gardening season: it's been the best yet, and it's not over because I have a boatload of items still to plant and the weather is cooperating for a change!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hooray, the best season ever sounds great! C. bungei is very nice, has gorgeous pink blossoms that appear nice and late in the season and smell wonderful. It's more of a wafting smell that's less noticeable when you put your nose right in the flower - strange. Anyway, it's a great plant!

      Delete
  10. If this is your neglected area I'd like to see a fussed-over area! It looks fab.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, there aren't any fussed-over areas in my garden this year but there's always another season to fix that, right?

      Delete
  11. August is supposed to be a slack time for gardeners, where a little benign neglect just adds to the rambling richness of the rank abundance of a fully bloomed out garden. Or so I tell myself as I spend quality time sitting on the patio.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like your reasoning! Now if I just planted all of those plants sitting on the patio table and chairs, I'd be able to sit out there and tell myself the same thing!

      Delete
  12. It all looks good to me Peter. I get to this time of year and don't have the energy to meticulously deadhead and strip out old foliage. I usually let it go then clean it all up after the first frost, which could be in another three to four weeks... Wahhhhh

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yikes three to four weeks? We don't usually get our first frost until late October and sometimes not a hard killing frost until mid to late November. Have you ever considered moving west?

      Delete
  13. Us gardeners are an optimistic bunch, always looking forward for to the next plant, the next garden ornament, un quenched thirst for the beauty of nature that sustains our body and spirit.

    I'm new to your blog and enjoys it a lot. As fellow PNW gardener, your voracious appetite for nurseries is familiar and comforting: I thought I was a little crazy, but now I know I'm in good company!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree! As for being a little crazy, I suspect that you are simply one of the crowd of gardeners that are a little crazy. Welcome to our loony bin! Thanks for finding my blog and for commenting!

      Delete
  14. I think your garden looks great! I bet we all wish our gardens looked better. We've had rain and mild temps (until now) most of the summer and I'm pretty happy with mine for now. Enjoy your weekend!
    Brenda

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Brenda. The plants are fine it's just that most years, I do more and there aren't plants in pots all over the garden waiting to be planted. There are always a few down in the area intended for plants like that but the seating areas in my garden are pretty much plant shelving right now.

      Delete
  15. Your garden looks great Peter, so lush and vibrant yet calm at the same time! And yes I agree that there's always the following season to look forward to but I think your garden is looking superb already. Hope you're having a fab weekend!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are too kind! I hope you're having a great weekend too.

      Delete
  16. Your garden looks wonderful, the Clerodendrum looks stunning, I like the color echo of that sword-shaped plant to the right. The Clerodendrum is tempting as I'm always looking for plants that can grow thickly enough to crowd out all the weeds. I'm still attempting to get rid of the remaining weeds that grew this year, a thankless task, and clear paths to put down wood chips from our chipper. I'm building a trellis for my massive rose that flops. I found some bargains at Fred Meyer and am planting them, and spending time harvesting vegetables- lots of beans, squash, and the tomatoes are finally ripening en masse. I'm tackling some areas overgrown with blackberry vines and attempting to remove more barriers to mowing so I have less to weed next year, as mowing seems to be the one thing that can keep the blackberry vines in check.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Those pesky blackberries! The birds keep planting them for me and I keep pulling them up but the garden didn't come with a thicket of them or anything so I consider myself lucky! The sword shaped plant is Canna 'Intrigue' which is one of my favorites! Sounds like you are continuing on with some great projects. Good for you!

      Delete
  17. Peter, nice little pond, although the bush and tree grew up fast. I was planning to move the perennials and some bushes as I have new fence. I love your canna blooming in red color.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Nadezda. Things do grow quickly here but once fall comes, all of the leaves on the tree and bushes will be gone and the view will change again. Hooray for your new fence!

      Delete
  18. That's not neglect, that's summer!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Gardens are pretty forgiving, as are gardeners: all we see here is the beauty.
    It's harvest season at the R&R Ranch, so while I'm itching to take advantage of the rain and cooler weather, I can hardly let all that fruit go to waste. The garden is neglected, but the pantry is filling up fast.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How cool is that? There's something very gratifying about canning, freezing, drying, produce from our gardens for winter. Sort of like storing up nuts for leaner times, it feels primal and satisfying. Didn't grow any edibles this year but had a grand time slicing up and freezing a couple of cases of gorgeous fresh peaches from a farmers market. It's like preserving little rays of summer sun and warmth to ease us through the PNW rain festival (Oct. 1 - July 5.)

      Delete

Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.