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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Friday, March 29, 2013

Chinese Reconciliation Park and Garden

Tacoma's Chinese Reconciliation Park and Garden, a project in process, was begun to help reconcile the expulsion of all of Tacoma's Chinese citizens in 1885.  It's been on my radar to visit since the ting was erected.  I finally made it to the park and thought that something sobering and about reconciliation might be appropriate for Good Friday.

  Love these stone bowls with rocks and water!



Would it be in really poor taste to sneak in and pave this with yellow bricks?
 Phases one and two have been completed; phases three and four are awaiting funding.
 Although it is new and incomplete, it's a wonderful and sobering place to visit. 


The ting was donated by Tacoma's sister city Fuzhou, China.  Materials arrived and craftsmen from China erected the structure on site. 
It's quite striking and one entrance is guarded by carved-stone dragons.


Ceiling

 Wouldn't it be amazing to have a structure like this in the middle of one's garden?


There is a lot of very nice hardscape but I'm looking forward to seeing more of the plant part of the garden.  Right now, there's not a lot  going on horticulturally. 

I'm sure that will come with time but the park is still a cool place to visit.
These carved reliefs along with the interpretive signs remind us of the events and the purpose of the park.

This shot was totally accidental.  I didn't even notice the guy pointing until I looked at my pictures later in the day.
 
One more place that I've always wondered about checked off  the list.  Happy Easter on Sunday!

20 comments:

  1. Very contemplative and appropriate space. The soft colors of newly emerging foliage make the bright structure even more striking. I love the carved stone bowls and modern stelea.

    We'll give the visitor the benefit of the doubt and assume he's not pointing the way out of town.

    Yes, I think yellow bricks would be in poor taste, but what do I know.



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    1. So, no yellow brick road?

      I'm looking forward to continued development of this great space.

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  2. Once again you show me something nearby that I've never heard of, I love it! Looks like an interesting place, which will be even more interesting with more plants established.

    Happy Good Friday, and Happy Hoppy Easter!

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    1. I agree. For some reason, I realy want large bamboo to screen the trains across the street. On the other hand, since Chinese workers are largely responsible for the rails crossing our country, maybe the proximity and visibility of the trains is appropriate.

      Happy Easter to you too, Alison!

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  3. Peter, this park is interesting and I look forward to see it completed. I love the dragon. is lovely and has a little one in his hands!
    Happy Easter!

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    1. It is a nice place to visit. Happy Easter to you in a few weeks!

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  4. Talk about establishing the "bones" of a garden right out of the chute! You can have the pleasure of watching it develop from the very start (and so will we)...what fun!

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    1. Because of the wonderful hardscape, it feels like it should be a mature garden but things are still so new.

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  5. Looking good already. We can just Imagine its potential once its finished!

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    1. It'll be interestng to watch the development!

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  6. Thanks for making me aware of this park. It is a comfort to know that Tacoma is acknowledging the kind of historical event this is usually banished from memory. As you probably know, the treatment of Chinese and other Asian immigrants in this country was shocking up through around World War II. The park's water features and other hardscape elements look very promising. I look forward to a future post on the park's completion.

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    1. It's funny, I'd seen the ting from the road quite a few times and kept wanting to go and see what was happening down there along the water but had no idea about the park's conciliatory purpose. I was familiar with the events and also the horrible loss of Tacoma's vibrant Japanese community when, during WWII, those people were sent to internment camps. While some of those citizens and their heirs continue to live in this area, the community never fully recovered. Sad that humans are such a rotten species.

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  7. The perfect acknowledgement and a beautiful cultural reminder for everyone who visits.

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  8. Looks like an interesting park to visit. I like those dragons. Happy Easter, Peter!

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  9. Happy Easter! Those stone reliefs are amazing, and I love the ceiling of the ting! Beautiful, and I can even feel the quiet mood of this place. The bridge is also beautiful, and seems to be symbolic of the joining together of two sides.

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    1. Happy Easter to you! I didn't even think of the bridge in that way but you're right. The eyes and insights of others is one of the wonderful things about bloggng. Thanks!

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.