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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Thursday, March 31, 2016

Meanwhile, Back at Home

Last weekend, I actually got to spend a couple of hours in my own garden.  I'm so looking forward to spring break when I'll actually have a few days to start some projects and get a few things done.  Here are a few pictures of what's happening in the Outlaw Garden at the end of March:

Out in the greenhouse, hippeastrum (Amaryllis) are blooming.

I finally hung the rusty metal chandelier made by Blackwaters Metal that came from the Northwest Flower and Garden Show in February.  I threw the crystals on but am not sure if I like them or not.  Should they stay or go?

The agaves all made it through the winter in pretty good shape, including the couple planted in the ground outside.

The three jasmines on the back wall started looking unhappy at the height of their blooming.  They may be removed from the greenhouse as they'll climb pretty high and block a lot of light.

Scadoxis punicus is blooming again this year and has produced a couple of tiny babies near the main stem.  It's hardy to zone 7 but must have great drainage in the winter.

Clivias are easy care and reliable performers for me. 

A few house plant experiments have gone well.  It's surprising that some tropical plants can take a bit more cold than one might think.

 The orange is blooming but I'm over it as it takes up so much space.  Next plant exchange, it'll be up for grabs.

Begonia  boliviensis, it's tuber so large that it's distorting the shape of the three gallon pot, is sending up nice new growth.  Perhaps it should be potted up.

Other tuberous begonias are pushing up new growth too.

It's magnolia time!  

It may be time to prune a bit of an opening here.  at one time the branches allowed a view of buddha and the large gunnera leaf casting at the top of the water thingy; now they almost totally obscure it.

Magnolia stellata 'Centennial Blush'  is a new addition this spring. I've admired the stellatas around town for years and how their buds look like giant pussy willow catkins in the winter.  Seeing this one with the pretty pink plush pushed me over the edge.


Rain followed by a wind storm did this to some of the blooms.  I hope it's not a regular habit of the plant to hold on to brown petals.

Cardiocrinum giganteum has such glossy leaves.  Everyone loves them, including the slugs!

Trillium.  Suppose it could be divided. 

My first rhododendron this season is 'President Roosavelt' just in time to clash with the other pinks in this bed. 

 Astilboides tabularis in a sea of maturing galanthus foliage. 

The way Sanguinaria canadensis 'Multiplex' leaves emerge hugging their flowers is adorable.
Rheum palmatum atrosanguineum

The spicy/sweet fragrance of Akebia quinata 'Shirobana' always catchers my attention before I notice the flowers.


The pot ghetto of newly separated Podophyllum delavayi  is doing nicely.

Hyacinths!

Syneilesis

My favorite Japanese maple (Acer palmatum) today is this one with  vibrant pink new growth. 


The green man is happy to have his shaggy hair back. 

I love this time of year in the garden!  

24 comments:

  1. The first leaves pushed up by many plants are so exciting and interesting! Such elaborate and varied ways of unfolding and expanding. Your Podophyllum photo makes me think of those huge, blobby toads or frogs. Love it!

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    1. Nature is pretty awesome, isn't it? Those Podophyllum do look a bit froggy now that you mention it.

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  2. Your Begonia boliviensis is much farther along than mine. One hasn't appeared at all and the other is just a tiny nub starting to push its way up. That Trillium is beautiful! I would leave it as is.

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    1. This Begonia boliviensis has always been a bit more vigorous than the others I have for some reason. Yea! I can cross dividing the trillium off of my list of things to do!

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  3. Oh those magnolias! Glorious display.

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    1. We're lucky to see that inherited tree out our kitchen window every day.

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  4. I always love getting a peek of your greenhouse and your garden looks extraordinarily happy. That first Magnolia took my breath away!

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    1. I'm looking forward to pulling some things out of the greenhouse for the summer. This time of year in PNW gardens is amazing. The growth happens so quickly that one can almost see it happen by the hour and the colors vibrate with new life.

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  5. I love the Trillium and the Rheum.

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    1. They're pretty swell at this time of the year. That Rheum gets ugly later in the season and leaves a giant hole in the middle of the bed where it's situated as leaves die off. I've seen them look gorgeous through the whole summer in other gardens.

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  6. The wide range of your plant interests continues to amaze me. And while I don't go out of my way for your average rhododendron (although there are some choice ones I like) I've got to say the foliage of "President Roosevelt" is spectacular!

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    1. Most rhododendrons don't do much for me but those with good foliage are always welcome.

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  7. Spring and spring break are really looking good on you! The trillium look especially fine :)

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    1. Thanks. Spring break will be this coming week and I'll finally have time to actually work in my own garden. Yea!

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  8. Love the chandelier, but the crystals seem to get lost in it. Could be the angle, or that it needs something with more presence. The clump of Trillium is wonderful; it probably looks amazing when the flower open up.

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    1. I think you're right about the crystals and I'll take them off. That particular trillium doesn't open up much more than that - it's odd that way but the foliage is spectacular.

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  9. Love the chandelier, but I say lose the crystals. Your post deserves more comment, but the oven timer just went off.

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    1. Right you are, crystals will be gone soon. Food beacons!

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  10. Oh, I agree: the Bloodroots are so fascinating when they emerge! You are ahead of us again this year but similar to Chicago. My sis-in-law said the Magnolias are blooming there. It's a good thing they aren't blooming yet here because the polar vortex is making another appearance this weekend. I fell in love with Clivias in San Diego--they were everywhere! Enjoy all the splendor of your spring garden!

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    1. It would be awful to loose magnolia flowers to a freeze! I hope you don't get too much damage from the predicted polar vortex!

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  11. I love this time of year too. So much is emerging and blooming and sprouting and glowing green. That clump of trillium is my favorite photo.

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    1. I've been very pleased with the Trillium's performance in that rather poor soil.

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  12. Yay for spring break, hope it's soon. Your Scadoxis punicus makes me think I need to try it again, I lost it to the PKW's because it was in a container and not at all protected. Did you get yours at Rare Plant Research?

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    1. Spring break is this coming week and I can't wait! I did get Scadoxis punicus at Rare Plant Research and it's still in the pot it came home in last year. Must have come from them at the Portland YG&P show as it grew and bloomed last year.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.