-

-
Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Thursday, June 18, 2015

The Garden of Linda Rasp and A Delightful Surprise

Walking down the drive to Linda Rasp's Bellevue garden I first noticed this gorgeous rusty metal panel.  the front garden has three of these that act as great focal points at the top of the sloping space. Don't worry about the petasides, they're all planted in pots sunken into the ground.  (Smart Idea!)


Santolina virens 'Lemon Fizz' dances beautifully with a purple leaved  Heuchera and Sedum ('Purple Emperor'?)


The foliage of   Epipactis gigantea 'Serpentine Night' caught everyone's eye.  Purple foliage with yellow orchid flowers?  Fabulous!


When I saw the black nursery pots, I knew that Ms Rasp was my kind of gardener.  Look, she even has tidy shelving to house her pot ghetto!

"Check out the greenhouse for the latest propagation experiment, and the fruit/vegetable are (all grown in containers.)"

A tomato choir  on risers!

"Plenty of perennials are grown in containers too." More plants in pots. I'm in love!




As we were walking around, who should appear but our pals Linda and Tom Reeder from Linda Letters.  Alison and I met Linda and Tom when we toured their garden  a couple of years ago and have been fans of the garden the blog, and the people since then.  You never know who you'll meet at open gardens!
 "My garden is an eclectic selection of garden art (lots of metal and cement) and unusual/rare plants. Featuring tropical plants to succulents intermingled with a collection of hardy fuchsias.  Densely planted beds are bursting with the lush foliage of trees, shrubs and perennials."


This gargoyle is here to make sure that no one parks in his garage!

Linda works with metal, (probably did the cool rusty metal screens herself!) found this pipe on Craigslist and cut it up to meet her needs.  Great drainage and under the eaves, a great spot for succulents

like these soon to be planted!

In the back garden there's space enough for the family's Great Danes to romp.   The pergola was originally built with the idea that Mr and Mrs. Rasp would be married beneath it but since they couldn't fit two hundred fifty people into their back yard, it was never used for that purpose.  The wisteria is dragging it down a bit (the pergola, not the marriage)  and a reinforcement or rebuild is planned.

Love this huge obelisk as it looks like a monument  in a graveyard.  

Beds ready to be planted.

As we were leaving, we noticed a neighbor's huge expanse of lawn while admiring peonies in the Rasp garden.  Mr. Rasp said the the non-gardening neighbors have given them permission to use their yard to expand their garden.  Be still my heart.   Don't let space envy get the best of you...here, look at something beautiful to calm yourself.  Fatsia japonica variegata.

"The garden is a work inprogress, so stop by this year and again next year to see the changes."  
I plan on doing exactly that!  Thank you, Linda, for opening your garden!  See you next year.

22 comments:

  1. Love the slope with the metal panel; its planted to perfection!
    The tomato "choir" is a sight to behold. I think you found a sole mate...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The slope was beautiful! Yes, we both have lots of plants in pots,don't we. I liked the idea of risers for the tomatoes. Mine are all over the greenhouse and it's becoming a tomato jungle in there.

      Delete
  2. It was a delightful surprise seeing Tom and Linda there! I hope the Rasps do open their garden again next year, so we can see how it has changed.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh the metal screen and pipes!!!! Want.

    ReplyDelete
  4. So many unique touches and look be that metal screen!

    ReplyDelete
  5. That is some pot ghetto! I might call it a pot condo instead. unapologetic use of black nursery pots is a breakthrough idea. Good job photographing the rusty screen. I tried several angles on a similar one the other day but could never get it right.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Black nursery pots are swell! The photograph of the screen was just luck.

      Delete
  6. For you, it was the black nursery pots - for me, it was the gargoyle on the garage roof. I loved that. I also loved the Epicactis gigantea and was delighted to see that it's suited to zone 10b but crushed by the need for "even moisture."

    ReplyDelete
  7. I'm not really a fan of plants in pots (he says after having just moved about 50 pots into the garage to hide them from tour visitors then back out again...)

    Great garden: rusty metal and bamboo in pots -- what's not to like?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your pot hiding made me laugh! What I love about the NPA garden tours is the diversity of the gardens from acres of estate gardens to tiny back yard spaces, it's all a celebration of the garden passion we share.

      Delete
  8. Love the greenhouse! And all the potted plants. And the metal sculpture, most of all! Great combinations.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was obviously the garden of a plant addict!

      Delete
  9. A gardener's garden, it's all about the plants! And the sculpture, and those pipes! I have serious plant lust for the Santolina 'Lemon Fizz' which is only available on the west coast. Loving these tours.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How come Santolina 'Lemon Fizz' isn't available in the east? Doesn't seem fair. It's a cool plant.

      Delete
  10. So is she using the black nursery pots to hold plants in reserve, or as garden containers (which is what I do because I can't bear to throw them out)? Excellent gargoyle.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think both. She's obviously a plant addict, which I say with respect, and hasn't yet prepared enough space to grow everything that she loves in the ground. I have a patio table and chairs that are currently so full of plants that we can't sit down out there.

      Delete
  11. Great use of purple foliage! I've been eyeing that epipactis. I need to start getting out on the weekends to visit gardens. Something (usually laziness) has gotten in the way the lat few weekends.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do love to tour gardens but now that school is out, I'm happy as a clam working in my own. I got way behind using my Saturdays going to plant sales, open gardens, nurseries, etc. and it's been wonderful to have weekdays off to try and get this garden going!

      Delete

Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.