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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Garden Bloggers' Fling - The Wave Garden

The Wave Garden is a one-third acre private garden on Richmond Point overlooking San Pablo Bay. The owners purchased the property to preclude development. They hired plantswoman Kelle Adams and concrete artist Victor Amador  to create a garden for the whole neighborhood to enjoy and gave them both creative freedom.   You can see great pictures of this garden here, here, here,  and here.  There are probably a lot of other great blog posts about it as well!

This was the fourth garden visit on day one of the fling, it was quite hot and we were tired but excited to see this special place.  Because parking a couple of buses in this residential area is a little tricky, we got to walk a block down to the garden.  Even before we got to the Wave,  cameras were clicking away at all of the far out plants!

I grow this aloe in a pot and bring it in for the winter.  Here it is growing in the ground.


Aloes in bloom.

One of the Restios (Rhodocoma capensis?)  Even though  I've studied the book Restios of the Fynbbos, I still have a horrible time differentiating between a few of these wonderful plants.


Aeoniums growing in the ground.  O.K. I'm going to try to stop saying , "growing in the ground" so much but it was incredible to see so many plants that we grow in pots and drag in for the winter happily growing in the ground here.  (How about just ITG?)

Grevillea loking a lot like G. Ned Kelley.  I'd left mine at home with buds and found them in glorious bloom here.  How beautiful. 



Here we are heading down the hill toward towards our destination.

Yes, that's the Golden Gate Bridge over there shrouded in fog. 

And a nice view of the city.
 





Beschorneria.  Notice the Aeonium 'Swarzkopf'  and white - flowered grevillea in the background.

Protea flowers.




Cantua buxifolia AKA "Sacred flower of the Andes"
 
Furcraea (ITG!)

Cussonia paniculata  (ITG!) Sigh.

Leucadendron 'Jester'  Beautiful!





 
The orange of the Protea picks up the orange edges of the succulents.
 
 
Echiveria elegans.  So blue and wonderful.


Beschorneria flower stalk with seed pods forming.

Kellee Adams, who designed the garden talked with us about its creation.

 
The concrete work is wonderful and unusual.

As is the iron work.








 
Another leucadendron


Beautiful seed heads on a restio.


Aeonium 'Sunburst'  Love this one! 

Grevillea x gaudichaudii.  Why aren't so many of these beauties hardy for me?




Eucalyptus flowers looking like fancy tassels for pillows, curtain tie backs or exotic dancers.

Still swooning over the huge and fragrant Eucalyptus trees everywhere.  This one offered welcome shade on this uncharacteristically hot day. 
 
Who should I find lurking in the shadows but my shady friend, Loree  with a final wave from the Wave garden. 
 


29 comments:

  1. Holy WOW!!!! That is one fabulous garden. I simply can not wrap my head around being able to grow all those fantastic plant ITG! You must have been over the moon to see that in person. TFS. Love it! Great post

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    1. I know, right? Many of these California gardens had me drooling over the horticultural delights growing ITG! I want to go back and visit several again when it's not so blazing hot!

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  2. It must have been an incredible experience to hear the garden designer's explanation! The plants are so different from ours in middle U.S.

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    1. We were lucky to hear her speak! Mostly it's about water conservation and heat tolerance in this garden because of the raised beds and because there's so much concrete that reflects and radiates heat. The plants are very different from what we can grow just 700 miles north of there.

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  3. This was such a fabulous garden, and I didn't enjoy it anywhere near as much as I should have, because of the heat, especially coming off all that concrete. This is another garden that I'd love to go back to some day, maybe on a nice cool spring day. Your post was actually better than seeing it in person, because you've identified stuff I didn't know, and I'm comfortably sitting in my nice cool bonus room upstairs in front of my computer.

    Thanks for a great post!

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    1. It's nice to look at these pictures in our delightfully cooler temperatures! I'd love to go back again with a car this time, revisit several of the gardens, and definitely do some plant shopping!

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  4. Yikes! Why am I hanging out next to the trash cans???

    So I'm curious if you got positive i.d. that was Grevillea x gaudichaudii or are assuming? I ask because of the Grevillea 'Austraflora Fanfare' I spotted later at Flora Grub, they look identical to me although G.'Austraflora Fanfare' seems to be less hardy. FYI I recently saw G. x gaudichaudii in the ground in Seattle looking quite happy. I want to try it so if you see it in a nursery please please let me know!

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    1. The trash cans were in the shade of that big Eucalyptus tree so it was a popular hang out!

      I took a picture of the nice sign on that Grevillea because I wondered about it. Dig had some several years ago and Ian shows a picture of one at Cistus. I'm thinking that asking Sean and/or Ian if they have one kicking around somewhere might be a good place to start. Maybe Kelly or Dan have some. If they do, I'd be happy to pick one up for you at the next Heronswood sale or at the Fronderosa Frolic.

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    2. A sign huh? Duh. I went back and looked and I took an picture of it too. Short term memory issues evidently (as you pointed out I am getting old!).

      Sean says he's got a few rooted cuttings but they need to grow on a bit. I'll ask Ian and yes if you see one you've got a standing "yes please" for purchase and I'll pay you back asap.

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  5. That garden speaks the language of my heart! I love it! Oh to grow those protea and Beschorneria. I am in love.

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    1. Aren't those plants dreamy? I could so get used to gardening there!

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  6. This weather wimp could never handle living in that climate but, oh! to be able to grow those beauties in the ground!

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    1. It's usually much cooler there, in fact, just the week before we left, they were predicting highs in the 60's.

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  7. It was a fascinating garden. Thanks for all the plant IDs!

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  8. This was built for the benefit of the neighborhood??? How cool is that! Those people deserve a medal - that garden is an absolute paradise!

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    1. It's a great garden and a special thing for the homeowners to do for the neighborhood!

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  9. This is a lovely garden Peter. All of these plants we grow here in the ground. I used to to get terribly upset because The Maple species don't do well here-too hot, and don't colour up well-not cold enough. But i'm over it.

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  10. Love the shot of the steps leading up into the garden.

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  11. We grow all of these plants in the ground here. I used to get terribly upset because the Maple species doesn't grow well here, too hot but i'm over it.

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    1. Yes, we can grow huge conifers, maples, and blue poppies easily here but I could give them up to be able to grow some of those fabulous plants!

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  12. I usually pack long johns if I'm going anywhere near our Norcal coast in summer. What a hot one it was that afternoon ! I'm going to go back the next time I go to Annies ...I love the photos you got--really nice plant portraits. How I love those Restios ! Funny, I am probably a 40 minute drive from this garden but in my garden the tenders (aeoniums, many of the Aloes) turn to black slime here if left out in winter.

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    1. That's very interesting! I just assumed that once you got south of Crescent City, you could grow just about anything in the ground. I so want to return to the bay area to revisit some places and explore some others! You're lucky to live so close!

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  13. It's a gorgeous garden for a multitude of reasons, but that view, wow!

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  14. I had never seen Grevillea x gaudichaudii and I think it is amazing!!! I like the leaves a LOT.
    I´ve seen many pictures of this garden and it must be gorgeous. Is it open to anyone to visit?

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    1. It is beautiful and open for anyone to visit!

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  15. Wish they all could be California girls? Dazzeling, for sure, but just wait 'til we roll out the charms of the PNW.

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    1. People will be blown away by our green conifer covered hills and mild weather!

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.